WHAT'S IT GOING TO BE?

What book should you read next? What words should you write next? Whether you're a reader, a writer, or both, you need look no further for ideas and pointers to help you make up your mind. You might even get your next book for free--and signed by the author!

Sometimes I even give away my own novels. My Inspirational romances and devotionals are pictured below and are detailed on my Books page. You can always count on a trace of humor in my novels and nonfiction. Whether you're a teen or a woman mature in years, I think these stories will ring true.

Read on, and discover some of today's most appealing Inspirational novelists, their latest books, and their words of wisdom and imagination. Enjoy!

Monday, April 1, 2019

H. L. Wegley and Free Books!

What would you do if you discovered the loving father who raised you by himself, after your mother’s death, was a KGB deep-cover plant who immigrated to the U.S. during the Cold War?

Before we meet today's author, I want to announce that the winner of the free copy of One Door Between Us, by Tom Donnan, is subscriber:

tumcsec@...

Congratulations! I'll email you to get your snail mail address and (assuming you live in the US) we'll get your book right out to you. I encourage readers to keep commenting and/or subscribe at right (above my list of books) in order to learn about new releases! U.S. subscribers are entered in the drawings a second time when they comment.

And now let's revisit with novelist H. L. Wegley, author of the romantic thriller, The Janus Journals (Trinity Press International, February 2019).

H. L. Wegley served as an Air Force Intelligence Analyst and a Weather Officer. In civilian life, he worked as a research scientist at a national lab, publishing in the scientific literature, then developed Boeing computing systems for twenty years before he and his wife retired near Seattle where they enjoy grandchildren, the rugged coast in the Olympic National Park and where he crafts his stories.

He is an award-winning author of inspirational thrillers and high-action, romantic-suspense novels.

Please tell us one random thing we might not know about you.

During the Carter and Reagan administrations, I served as a member of the team of atmospheric scientists who managed the meteorological component of the Federal Wind Energy Program. There I represented the United States on an international work group studying the application of wind forecasts to wind-turbine operation and economics. If you Google “H. L. Wegley wind energy,” you’ll find some of my publications. It’s amazing that they’re still around after all these years.

Yes, the Internet is forever! 

Please tell us a bit more about the plot of The Janus Journals.

For recent college graduate, Alisa (Allie) Petrenko, the Cold War never ended. When her father is murdered, he left her with a warning, an assassin on her trail, and his secret history contained in a set of journals.

As Allie tries to elude the assassin and read the journals, she learns that the loving father who raised her was not the man he appeared to be, and the man she must now trust with her life is someone Allie must never trust with her heart.

The Janus Journals, set in Virginia and near Lake Chelan in Washington State, is high-action romantic suspense at its best. The dual timeline will take you on an epic journey through the twilight years of the Cold War that reshaped one man’s destiny while creating deadly tentacles, reaching into the present, threatening an innocent young woman.

What is it about your lead characters that will make your readers care about them?

Allie Petrenko lost her mother to a dread disease when Allie was five. This left her an agnostic with a paralyzing fear of death, thanatophobia. The readers will root for her as she tries to become a fearless young woman who thinks of herself as honorable, lovable, and strong rather than despicable and cowardly.

Grady Jamison’s sister was a passenger in his car when a drunk hit them, killing her. Grady thinks that protecting Allie from the assassin is his chance to redeem himself and end his deep-seated guilt. However, there are a lot more benefits to knowing Allie Petrenko than Grady could possibly realize. But readers will probably discover this long before Grady because, as we all know, guys are clueless.

I love the levity at the end of such a serious plot summary.

Please share with us a quote about writing that you find inspiring.

"A powerful story without a biblical worldview is a great escape to nowhere. A spiritual message without an entertaining story is a sermon, not a novel." — Randy Singer

I’ve taken this to heart and try to write stories in light of Randy Singer’s assertions.

That's such a great reminder. I'm in the middle of writing a novella right now, and this quote inspires me to keep the Lord in mind while my heroine's story unfolds.

What is the last novel you read that you would recommend?

Heart of the Country by Rene Gutteridge, she took a movie script, a barebones story, and fleshed it out into a superb novel with three-dimensional characters. It is the job of living actors and actresses to make a script come to life. But few people can do what Rene did with someone else’s story. Heart of the Country is a good teaching/learning tool for authors. If you enjoy audiobooks, the audio version is superb.

Rene's so talented and definitely knows her way around a script.

What are you working on now?

I’m working on a story that doesn’t yet have a name, though I’m considering Bold Betrayal as a possible title. Its plot might have been borrowed from news media headlines, depending on which media sources one reads. The story is about a young man who uncovers the impacts of biases in a search-engine company’s algorithms and data presentation. He predicts this company will determine the next president of the United States. And he makes an accusation that the bias is subtle and intentional. But before he can release his report—yeah, bad things happen. This novel will release about May 1, 2019.

Sounds exciting!

Where else can readers find you online?

I am fairly active on Facebook and Twitter. Here are some places readers can find me:

Website: www.hlwegley.com
Amazon
Twitter
Goodreads
Facebook author’s page
Many of my readers have friended me and use my FB profile page: Facebook profile

The book can be purchased online via the following button:



I'm going to ask a question for my blog readers and subscribers to answer. When you read Harry's description of his heroine, Allie, and her paralyzing fear, can you bring to mind anyone in your life (even if it's you) who has overcome something seemingly insurmountable in his or her life? Who comes to mind?

Thank you, Harry, for visiting and telling us about yourself and your book. Readers, Harry has offered to give away a free copy of his novel. To enter, leave a comment and your email below in answer to my question, above. "Please enter me" won't get you entered. Remember that U.S. subscribers are entered an additional time in each drawing. The drawing is done by email, so leave your email address, like so: trish[at]trishperry[dot]com. 

Only United States residents are eligible for the drawing, but anyone can subscribe to the blog posts via the GDPA-compliant Feedblitz box above my list of books, at right.

Also readers, I'd love it if you'd connect with me on Facebook. Just click on my name at the right of today's post title.

Remember, if you'd like information on additional new releases, check out Christian Book Heaven, an email newsletter for Christian book deals in whatever genres you select. You can subscribe here: ChristianBookHeaven

Annoying legal disclaimer: drawings void where prohibited; open only to U.S. residents; the odds of winning depend upon the number of participants. See full disclaimer, GDPA notice, and my Disclosure of Material Connection HERE

23 comments:

Alice Myers said...

Hi Trish and Harry! I don't know anyone that fits your question but I have a fear of birds that I must battle.
Myersalicem@gmail.com

H L Wegley said...

My fear of birds is real, but limited to bird bombings. Many years ago I was wearing a beautiful wool sweater my then fiancee (now wife of nearly 53 years) gave me as a gift. Regardless of how I tried to clean it, it never looked the same after the seagull bombed it. :(

Karen said...

I have someone close to me who has overcome great physical handicap and continues on optimistically despite a life-altering accident. I’m so proud of them!

mylittlebirdiebooks [at] gmail [dot] com

Trish Perry said...

Karen, your comment brings to mind my sister, who was born with several physical challenges but tried her very best to live a "normal" life. She had to face many fears and unknowns because of her health. I had so much respect for her courage, strength, and optimism. The Lord drew her to Him when she was in her 30's, and I love that I'll see her again someday.

Gail H. said...

Hearing I had breast cancer threw me for a loop but with God’s help and strength we faced it together. I am now a seven year survivor. But the fear of recurrence paralyzes me momentarily each year when I face another mammogram.
tumcsec(at)gmail(dot)com

Kathy Anderson said...

Hi Trish and Harry,
My daughter-in-law has recently been diagnosed with a rare heart condition. She is glad to finally have answers for how weak she felt. She is determined to not let this condition dictate how she lives and experiences her life.

phoneticpanda(at)Gmail(dot)com

Alicia Haney said...

Hi, first of all I want to tell you that your book sounds very intriguing! I would really love to read it. Recently losing my mom of 87 years old and me being in my middle sixties, just knowing that one day it will be my turn is kind of scary, but only God knows when that will be, so why fret, just enjoy life right, thats all we have to do, be glad for another day in our lives. God Bless you. aliciabhaney@sbcglobal.net

Gail H. said...

Alicia I can sympathize. I lost my mother a year and a half ago at age 82. I took care of her for a year at my home. Losing my mom was one of the hardest things I’ve ever gone through. There’s just something special about a mother/daughter relationship that can’t be replaced. I too am in my midsixties. Our lives are but a vapor but I’m trying to live life each day to the fullest.

Library Lady said...

9 years ago my husband fell and broke his neck.
The doctor said that by all rights he should be either dead or paralyzed.
Thanks be to God who wasn't ready for him yet and thanks be to the many people all over the world who prayed for him.
He truly is one of God's Miracles from Heaven.
Janet E.
von1janet(at)gmail(dot)com

H L Wegley said...

Replying to Alicia Haney - As one who has a few years on you, dying and going home gets less threatening with each year. And when you think of the benefits -- grand reunions with loved ones, a body that never wears out and is pain-free, no more living on a fallen planet -- the fear fades almost completely away.

H L Wegley said...

Replying to Library Lady, That would be a scary accident. My wife has threatened me with serious bodily harm if I even think of going up on our roof. Since she has reddish hair, freckles, and is Iris -- well she's Irish except for the part of her that is Sioux -- I listen. Minor neck injuries when I was a teenager were enough to get my attention. They still do whenever the weather changes. :)

H L Wegley said...

Replying to Gail H - My mom died about 4 years ago and my dad died 7 years prior to that. It's a strange feeling knowing there's no one left ahead of you in the family line. And if you're the oldest sibling, you really are the head of the clan. That raises unsettling questions like, can I lead our family as well as my grandparents or my parents did? It's sobering but it's also an opportunity to lead in a godly manner.

Vie said...

Hi, Harry and Trish!
First, thanks for the great interview. I am intrigued by the storyline of The Janus Journals and would love to read it. I'm not as familiar with west coast authors, but after reading this interview I'm happy to meet you, and I'll look forward to visiting your social media sites to learn about your other books.
Sincerely,
Vie

Vie said...

PS I forgot to answer the question. I have a friend who was widowed with two 16-year-old boys (adopted an infant and gave birth to another 8 months later). Her determination to carry on and provide for her boys has always impressed me. She was quick to tell you that her strength was from the Lord.

H L Wegley said...

Replying to Vie - Thanks for your interest in my writing, Vie! The Janus Joournals is book number 12 for me. I'm published both traditionally and independently. I love having control over my publishing schedule, but covet (uh, not a good word), want (better), rather, I appreciate the marketing benefits provided by a major publisher. Book promotion is my least favorite part of being an author, though I do enjoy interacting with my readers.

agboss said...

Our family recently went through a very scary time in our lives. My healthy, robust husband unexpectedly went into congestive heart failure due to an unknown tear in the mitral valve of his heart. On December 26, 2017 he had to have emergency open heart surgery. God graciously spared his life and he has made an AMAZING recovery!! He is my miracle! We never know how much time we have on this earth or when God may call us or one of our loved ones home to be with Him. It is a reminder to make the most of the time we have living for Jesus, sharing the good news of salvation, and loving our family and friends well. ~Alison Boss

H L Wegley said...

The heart is the pumper of life. Surgery related to it is always concerning. I remember when my 82-year-old father-in-law had high-risk surgery to repair his aorta. When we each talked to him before they rolled him away to the OR, it was like saying our last goodbyes. But God brought him through with an incredibly quick recovery. Before we knew it, he was back on the golf course. These bodies we're given, even after the fall, are fearfully and wonderfully made. But what we get at the resurrection, I can't begin to imagine how wonderful that will be.

Trish Perry said...

Harry, considering that your heroine's paralyzing fear of death is not only rooted in the loss of her mother but probably also rooted in her lack of faith, I'm amazed at how often we believers fear death. Like many commenters here, I lost both of my parents two years ago, and that loss certainly does cause one to ponder death more seriously.

As Gail says, life is a vapor and we should live our lives to the fullest. And as Alicia says, we should enjoy it, knowing God is in control.

Melanie Backus said...

I have a fear of snakes but I became brave enough to deal with one when it was trying to bite my dog.
mauback55 at gmail dot com

H L Wegley said...

Trish, Yes, believers aren't losing anything by death, and they're gaining so much. For many of us, the fear is probably more about what we might have to endure as we approach death. But we know that we don't walk that path alone.
I had a bad reaction to an antibiotic once and was sure I was dying. I still remember the throughts that ran through my mind. God, why are you taking me now. I'm only 31.
When it felt like life was slipping away, I gave up fighting and prayed Stephen's prayer, “Lord Jesus, receive my spirit.” But He didn't. He gave me back my desire to live and a surge of incredible strength enabling me to fight through the pain until the ambulance got me to the hospital. I don't think there will be nearly as much fear the next time I face death, because it was obvious to me who was in control of what happened to me. It sure wasn't me. :)

H L Wegley said...

Melanie, I was raised where there were a lot of big, venom-dripping-from-fangs timber rattlers. I had many encounters with them, so I'm afraid of snakes that have fangs, especially venomous snakes. I've got some great stories to tell about those encounters, but you probably don't want to hear them. :)

Vivian Furbay said...

What an interesting and dangerous story realizing your father is actually a Russian spy. Vivian Furbay jtandviv (at) q (dot) com

H L Wegley said...

Replying to Vivian,
What makes it even more disturbing is that this is the man who raised her by himself after her mother died, the one person whe trusted to love and understand her.

 

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