WHAT'S IT GOING TO BE?

What book should you read next? What words should you write next? Whether you're a reader, a writer, or both, you need look no further for ideas and pointers to help you make up your mind. You might even get your next book for free--and signed by the author!

Sometimes I even give away my own novels. My Inspirational romances and devotionals are pictured below and are detailed on my Books page. You can always count on a trace of humor in my novels and nonfiction. Whether you're a teen or a woman mature in years, I think these stories will ring true.

Read on, and discover some of today's most appealing Christian novelists, their latest books, and their words of wisdom and imagination. Enjoy!

Thursday, December 31, 2009

Happy New Year and Free Books!

For my last post of 2009, I want to share a few ideas with you fiction writers and a few ideas with you fiction readers. First, writers, if you haven't yet picked up a copy of The Art of War for Writers, I want to encourage you to do so.

I own (and love) both of James Scott Bell's How-To books, Plot & Structure, and Revision & Self-Editing. They're meaty, full of practical teaching and exercises for new and experienced novelists.

The Art of War for Writers is a different animal. While this book also teaches and includes a number of hands-on exercises, it's more like sitting down with a wise old man (not that Jim Bell is old, mind you) and soaking up his expertise. Again and again--because the book is set up in quick, pithy snippets that can be consumed in-between demands on your time. I found myself looking forward to sneaking away for a chapter or two between my own bouts of writing and errand running.

The inspirational quality of Bell's pointers will assure readers they can write their passion. But my favorite quality in this book reminded me of a scene in the movie Moonstruck, when Cher's character smacks Nicholas Cage's love-struck character in the face and yells, "Snap out of it!" Bell dispels a number of misconceptions about novel writing, encouraging new writers to face reality and pursue success anyway.

The book is visually attractive and would make a lovely gift book for any writer, novice or otherwise. If you're a writer or would like to be one, you'll want your very own copy, so you can mark it as you read. Why? Because the information Bell gives makes such perfect sense as you read it, you'll find yourself thinking, "Well, of course! I'm bound to remember that." But you won't. You'll want to come back to this little red gem time and again, to refresh, re-arm, and remember what makes a novel great. Highly recommended.


Another item for writers (and readers, actually) is a glimpse at how differently our creative juices flow. This month I asked my interviewees to complete this opening sentence:

Ella planned to lie about where she had been, but . . .

Take a look at the endings we got:


PhotobucketFrom Janice Thompson, who writes across genre lines but often incorporates humor in her novels: Ella planned to lie about where she had been, but figured the dog would rat her out.



PhotobucketFrom suspense novelist Ramona Richards: Ella planned to lie about where she had been, but the sharp tack of her conscious made her a lousy liar, even if the body at her feet hadn't been a dead giveaway to her recent whereabouts.


PhotobucketSusan Page Davis typically writes historical romance and romantic suspense. Her ending: Ella planned to lie about where she had been, but she scrapped that plan when she realized she'd been followed.




PhotobucketHistorical romance writer Linore Rose Burkard.com wrote: Ella planned to lie about where she had been, but during the long drive home she listened to a radio show on How to Be Authentic, and the show host actually talked her out of it! She used scripture quotes to back up her points, and in the end, Ella knew she could no longer lie to her room-mate. She'd have to tell the truth, come what may.


PhotobucketMystery/suspense writer Terry Brennan wrote: Ella planned to lie about where she had been, but the last time she lied Christmas came a month late, her husband walked out of her life and into prison, and Ralph Henderson lay dead in her driveway.



Historical author Golden Keyes Parsons wrote: Ella planned to lie about where she had been, but her scheming collapsed upon seeing the face of her distraught mother.


I'd love to hear your reactions to the above approaches to story beginnings. So I'm going to give away one of my books to someone who comments, below. Tell me which of the above openings clicked best for you--which story would you sit down and read? I'll draw a name from the commenters next Thursday, January 7, and that person can tell me which of my books she/he would like. Leave your email address, in case you win, like so: trish[at]trishperry[dot]com.

And be sure to check out my interview of Golden Keyes Parsons and leave a comment below her interview for a chance to win a signed copy of her novel, A Prisoner of Versailles.

Annoying legal disclaimer: drawings void where prohibited; open only to U.S. residents; the odds of winning depend upon the number of participants.


Speaking of giveaways, the person who won today's drawing for my copy of Syrie James's The Lost Memoirs of Jane Austen is:

andrealschultz@ . . .

Congratulations! I'll contact you today for your snail mail address, and we'll get your book to you right away. I encourage readers to keep commenting and/or subscribe at right in order to participate in future book give-aways!


Finally, one last item of interest for readers:

FictionFinder.com:
Finding Christian fiction the easy way

ACFW launches new free online resource to search for titles


PALM BAY, Fla. -- With over 500,000 books published each year, it is harder than ever to find a new book that's just right. A simple Amazon search in the Christian literature and fiction category yields more than 17,000 results. Consumers wading through the exhaustive, seemingly endless list of choices now have a more manageable resource to help them purchase their next book.

American Christian Fiction Writers (ACFW), the nation's leading Christian fiction writers' organization, is launching FictionFinder.com, a new free resource for retailers, readers, media and other Christian fiction fans to search for authors and books. The search engine allows users to sort by author, title, genre, topic, publication date, and target audience.

Cynthia Ruchti, president of American Christian Fiction Writers (ACFW), believes this trusted, easy-to-use resource is a significant development in the search for Christian fiction authors and new titles.

"The idea rose from a roundtable discussion between the ACFW leadership team and Christian booksellers looking for a better way to connect their customers with great Christian fiction," says Ruchti. "ACFW responded by rolling up our sleeves and creating a comprehensive database to serve readers, booksellers, publishers, authors, book club coordinators, librarians and others on the hunt for information and inspiration."

The site also allows readers to learn about the nature of the content of each book. Each title is rated for action, conflict, humor, mystery, romance, spirituality and suspense, in addition to more sensitive issues like language, sensuality and violence. Users can also post reviews to the site and learn more about soon-to-be-released titles.

The database is the first of its kind and is not limited to books written by ACFW members. The organization is also working with publishers to ensure Christian novels by other authors are incorporated as well.

ACFW's presence as the voice of Christian fiction and its industry prowess has long been recognized, and its authors are a mainstay on bestseller lists. FictionFinder.com is the organization's latest effort to make finding the best in Christian fiction as easy as possible for fans around the world.

Quick facts about fictionfinder.com:

* Book information pages include facts about the publisher, main themes, setting and the author's other titles.

* A special "similar books" section offers other titles the user may be interested in reading.

* Users can create an account with their preferences, making it easier to find new favorites.

With nearly 2,000 members and 19 chapters in 14 states nationwide, ACFW seeks to promote Christian Fiction through developing the skills of its authors, educating them in the market, and serving as an advocate in the industry. Founded in 2000 under the banner of American Christian Romance writers, in 2004 the organization was renamed American Christian Fiction Writers (ACFW) to reflect its dedication to Christian fiction writers of all genres.

ACFW is headquartered in Palm Bay, Florida. Their advisory and operating boards work to give writers the tools they need to develop their craft, grow ACFW's extensive publishing knowledge and secure relationships with industry professionals. To learn more about ACFW and their authors, please visit www.acfw.com.


God bless you all! Happy New Year, and I'll see you in 2010!

Monday, December 28, 2009

Golden Keyes Parsons and Free Books!

The second book of the A DARKNESS TO LIGHT series, A Prisoner of Versailles continues to follow the life of Madeleine Clavell and her turbulent relationship with Louis XIV, and the harrowing consequences thereof, first chronicled in In the Shadow of the Sun King.

Before we meet today's featured author, I want to announce that the winner of the drawing for The Sacred Cipher, by Terry Brennan, is:

writer_weaver@ . . .

Congratulations! I'll contact you today for your snail mail address, and we'll get your book to you right away. I encourage readers to keep commenting and/or subscribe at right in order to participate in future book give-aways!

And now let's revisit novelist Golden Keyes Parsons, author of A Prisoner of Versailles (Thomas Nelson Publishing, 2009).

Golden Keyes Parsons is an author and a popular conference and retreat leader. Her first novel, the highly acclaimed In the Shadow of the Sun King, was a finalist for Book of the Year in the debut author category by the American Christian Fiction Writers. She and her husband are both retired pastors and live close to their three daughters and eight grandchildren in Waco, Texas.

Please tell us a bit more about the plot of A Prisoner of Versailles.

PhotobucketThe palace of Versailles, replete with splendor and beauty, is the last place that Madeline wants to be as she deals with the death of her beloved husband, Francois. In the midst of deep and grievous loss, Madeline's past catches up to her and she becomes a captive in the palace of Louis XIV. Will she ever escape? What will the unpredictable Sun King do? Madeline cannot and will not deny Christ, yet it will take all the hope and faith she can muster to outmaneuver the king. Does she have the courage to try?

Which character in your novel most interested you while you wrote?

It would, of course, be Madeleine Clavell, the heroine of the novel. She and the Clavell family are patterned after my ancestors. I found it challenging to make her a strong woman, who had to fight for the survival of her family, while at the same time making her relatable to the reader. For some reason, strong women are intimidating to many people.

Why will readers enjoy your novel?

There's action, drama, intrigue, the glamour of the French court . . . and a bit of romance thrown in. There is enough action that men are enjoying my novels as well as women. I find that very fulfilling as an author.

Well, I haven't read this one yet, but I loved your first. I'm eager to read what happens next. And, yes, the romance really grabbed me, even though it wasn't the main element in the story.

If you were the casting director for the film version of your novel, who would play your lead roles?


Ah, I get that question often, and it's one that I enjoy answering, because I love good movies so much.

PhotobucketFor Madeleine I would chose Catherine Zeta Jones

Photobucketor Julia Ormond.






PhotobucketKeanu Reeves would make a great Francois--quiet strength.

PhotobucketFor Pierre, I think either Antonio Banderas

Photobucketor Johnny Depp.






PhotobucketAnd for King Louis Russell Crowe

Photobucketor Daniel Day-Lewis.

Great casting ideas! I'm ready for the movie.

This month we're looking at writing prompts. Pretend you have to start a story with these words, and give us an idea of how you would end this first sentence:


Ella planned to lie about where she had been, but . . . her scheming collapsed upon seeing the face of her distraught mother.

I love to see how the various genre authors differ in their answers. I think on my last post of the year, I'll list all of the different answers together.

What facet of the writing craft comes easiest to you?


The easiest part for me are the technical parts of writing--spelling, grammar, structure. I had a really good education in the mechanics of writing.

What do you struggle with?

I struggle with what is and is not "acceptable to the reader." I think I have a really good plot idea and am told that the reader won't accept such and so. I also struggle with making the language suitable for my historicals. I tend to write dialogue that is too modern. And I seem to have trouble tying up loose ends in a manner that will be satisfying to the reader.

I have such respect for historical writers because of their added challenge to make everything suitable to the time frame. That challenge is s one of the reasons I haven't written historicals yet.

Someone has just handed you a box containing exactly what you need at this moment in time. It's not food. What’s in the box?


Great question. My husband and I are believing God for answers to prayers concerning physical, as well as spiritual, provision for our family. I would love it if those promises that we believe he has given us would appear in the mail today!

What is the last book you read that moved you?

I think the last book(s) that really carried me away were Ted Dekker's "Trilogy." I haven't read Green yet, but I can't wait to get my hands on it.

What are you working on now?

Revisions on Book Three in the series, Where Hearts Are Free, due to be released Fall 2010.

Where else can readers find you or your writing online?

www.goldenkeyesparsons.com
www.thomasnelson.com
www.amazon.com
www.christianbook.net

Thanks, Trish!

Thank you, Golden, for visiting with us and telling us about A Prisoner of Versailles. Readers, Golden has offered to give a copy of her novel to the winner of our drawing on Monday, January 4. To enter, leave a comment for Golden, below. Leave your email address, in case you win, like so: trish[at]trishperry[dot]com.

Check out my interview of Randy Ingermanson, below. Randy's new release, Writing Fiction for Dummies, would make an excellent addition to the library of any new or experienced fiction writer. Leave a comment for Randy below his interview, and I'll enter your name in my New Year's Eve drawing for Syrie James' novel The Lost Memoirs of Jane Austen.

Annoying legal disclaimer: drawings void where prohibited; open only to U.S. residents; the odds of winning depend upon the number of participants.

Thursday, December 24, 2009

Merry Christmas and Free Books!

Merry Christmas, everyone! I'm sure you're busy baking or enjoying family today. So I'm just posting today's book winner and running back to the kitchen, myself!

The winner of Linore Rose Burkard's novel, The Country House Courtship, is:

mce1011@ . . .

Congratulations! I'll contact you today for your snail mail address, and we'll get your book to you right away. I encourage readers to keep commenting and/or subscribe at right in order to participate in future book give-aways!

Before you dash through the snow in a one-horse open sleigh, check out my interviews of Terry Brennan and Randy Ingermanson, below. Leave a comment for Terry below his interview and be entered to win a copy of his latest novel, The Sacred Cipher, on Monday, December 28. If you subscribe to my blog, at right (or if you're already subscribed), you'll be entered an additional time to this drawing and all future drawings.

Randy's new release, Writing Fiction for Dummies, would make an excellent addition to the library of any new or experienced fiction writer. Leave a comment for Randy below his interview, and I'll enter your name in my New Year's Eve drawing for Syrie James' novel The Lost Memoirs of Jane Austen.

Annoying legal disclaimer: drawings void where prohibited; open only to U.S. residents; the odds of winning depend upon the number of participants.

May you all have a blessed, merry Christmas, celebrating the most important event in the history of mankind. Awesome!

Monday, December 21, 2009

Terry Brennan and Free Books!

You hold in your hands an ancient, secret document that could trigger an Arab-Israel nuclear war--or permanent peace in the Middle East . . . life as we know it hangs in the balance . . . four Americans are caught in the crossfire . . . and opposing zealots will stop at nothing to get their hands on The Sacred Cipher.

Before we meet today's featured author, I want to announce that the winner of the drawing for The Sheriff's Surrender, by Susan Page Davis, is:

prettyhearth@ . . .

Congratulations! I'll contact you today for your snail mail address, and we'll get your book to you right away. I encourage readers to keep commenting and/or subscribe at right in order to participate in future book give-aways!

And now let's meet novelist Terry Brennan, author of The Sacred Cipher (Kregel Publications, July 2009).

PhotobucketOver the past 35 years, Terry Brennan has accumulated a broad range of experience in both the profit and non-profit business sectors. His 22-year, award winning journalism career included:

Seven years as a sportswriter and editor with The Philadelphia Bulletin, at the time the largest-circulation afternoon newspaper in the nation; leading The Mercury of Pottstown (PA), as its editor, to a Pulitzer Prize in Editorial Writing; and serving as Executive Editor of a multi-national newspaper firm--Ingersoll Publications--with papers in the USA, England, and Ireland.

In 1996 Brennan transferred his successful management career to the non-profit sector and served for 12 years as Vice President of Operations for the Christian Herald Association, Inc., the parent organization of four New York City ministries, including The Bowery Mission.

Now Vice President of the National Organization on Disability in Manhattan, Brennan also won the Valley Forge Award for editorial writing from the Freedoms Foundation. His two adult sons and their families live in Pennsylvania. Terry, his wife Andrea, and their two adult children live in New York City. His first novel, The Sacred Cipher, was published by Kregel Publications and released in July of 2009.

Please tell us a bit more about the plot of your novel.

PhotobucketHistory's greatest secret could be tomorrow's greatest threat. More historically and biblically accurate than The DaVinci Code and just as adventurous as an Indiana Jones movie, The Sacred Cipher combines action and mystery to draw readers into a world of ancient secrets and international escapades. When an ancient scroll appears in a secret room of the Bowery Mission in New York City, Tom Bohannon is both stunned and intrigued. The enigma of the scroll's contents will send Bohannon and his team ricocheting around the world, drawing the heat of both Jewish and Muslim militaries, and bringing the Middle East to the brink of nuclear war in this heart-pounding adventure of historical proportions. The Sacred Cipher is a riveting, fact-based tale of mystery and suspense.

Which character in your novel most interested you while you wrote?

My favorite character is a guy named Sammy Rizzo, who is part of the 'team' searching for the keys to The Sacred Cipher. Sammy is outrageous. He is everything I am not--outspoken, funny, secure enough to wear the most outlandish clothes. Or . . . so it seems. Sammy happens to be a little person who overcompensates for his short stature by being constantly over the top. Writing Sammy has been one way I've become more sensitive to the realities facing people with disabilities. Sammy is fun and discovering his story was fascinating. I'm constantly amazed at the things that come out of his mouth. And I like him.

Why will readers enjoy your novel?

The Sacred Cipher is a contemporary tale of mystery, intrigue and suspense wrapped around a historical novel--based on real people, real places and real events--encapsulated by an archeological treasure hunt that threatens the lives of all those involved. All of which culminates in a revelation that could be ripped from tomorrow's headlines and which, if true, could lead the Middle East to the cusp of nuclear war. And the story is more than plausible.

It's a rollicking, fast-paced adventure, a combination of Indiana Jones, The DaVinci Code and the Jason Bourne movies, filled with fascinating historical lore. Judging from the reviews, it's a story that has captured the imagination of both male and female readers.

If you were the casting director for the film version of your novel, who would play your lead roles?

My wife and kids and I have played this game many times over dinner:

PhotobucketFor the lead, Tom Bohannon: Robert Downey, Jr. or Gerard Butler (if makeup could age him a bit) or, more of a long shot, Aiden Quinn or Liev Schrieber.

PhotobucketWe all agree Sean Connery or Gabriel Byrne or, perhaps, Harrison Ford should be Dr. Richard Johnson, Jr.

PhotobucketDanny DeVito or Paul Giammati or Sean Astin as Sammy Rizzo.

PhotobucketCharlize Theron or Drew Barrymore or Kate Hudson or Rachel McAdams as Kallie Nolan.

PhotobucketFor Joe Rodriguez, Amaury Nolasco (from Prison Break TV show).

PhotobucketAs Tom's wife, Annie--Jennifer Connelly or Tea Leoni.

This month we’re looking at writing prompts. Pretend you have to start a story with these words, and give us an idea of how you would end this first sentence:

Ella planned to lie about where she had been, but . . . the last time she lied Christmas came a month late, her husband walked out of her life and into prison, and Ralph Henderson lay dead in her driveway.

That's a nice, meaty opening sentence!

What facet of the writing craft comes easiest to you? What do you struggle with?


The easiest part is coming up with basic plot. I'm a plot-driven writer, so it's not hard for me to come up with basic plot ideas. I have several plot ideas tucked away that will be my next few books.

Flushing out the plot details is not that difficult, either. It takes time and effort, and there are many days when I'm stuck and frustrated, or I find myself written into a corner I can't seem to escape. But my 22 years in journalism, more than half as a sportswriter often writing on deadline, effectively trained me to write when it was time to write. Sit down and get the fingers moving. I often say I think through my fingers, and it is often true. I just sit down and start at some part in the plot (never sequential) and put my fingers to work. Most of the time, the story reveals itself.

And I love doing research, finding cool little unknown tidbits that add depth to the story.

One of my greatest struggles is in character development. That takes a lot of effort. Understanding and developing motivation . . . building characters of complexity and depth . . . those are continuous challenges for me.

I struggle with confidence, and I haven’t overcome that one yet. Organization, and I haven't overcome that one yet. But the greatest roadblock is discipline. When I have it, magic happens. When I don't, nothing happens. Creating and sticking to a rigid schedule is one of the few ways I've found to establish discipline.

Choose an inanimate object to represent you. Explain what you have in common with that object.

I would like to think I'm like a tree. Deeply rooted in good soil, providing cool relief from the heat and sun, protection from the wind and rain. Solid. Dependable. Unmoved by the winds of time and circumstance. But changeable by the seasons and maturing of life.

What is the last book you read that moved you?

Cormack McCarthy's The Road. It's a desolate story, in the wake of a nuclear holocaust. The images evoked by McCarthy are both stunning and disturbing. I was fascinated by the story but frightened by its implications. At the same time, The Road is a tender love story of a man for his son and the things a man of character will do to protect and save those he loves. It's a profoundly powerful story.

What are you working on now?

I've written a second novel called Hunger's Ransom. It's a good yarn, a mystery/suspense story set against the back drop of the world food crisis. But I wrote it fairly quickly after The Sacred Cipher was sold to Kregel Publications. I have to admit I got careless . . . thought I had this book-writing thing knocked. Can you spell p-r-i-d-e? So, Kregel sent it back. It's going to take some substantial re-writing.

That one I've set aside for the time being because I'm already deeply involved in the sequel to The Sacred Cipher. It's another globe-trotting adventure/mystery/suspense novel that intertwines historical fact with contemporary, international politics, a work-in-progress that is titled Scorpion Pass.

Where else can readers find you or your writing online?

Other than a Facebook page, my only Internet exposure at this point is my blog at terrybrennan.blogspot.com.

The Sacred Cipher can be purchased on Amazon, Barnes&Noble, and Christian Book Distributors.

Here's a link to a 90-second video trailer.

Thanks for your interest in The Sacred Cipher and I hope you all enjoy reading the book as much as I did in writing it.

Thank you, Terry, for visiting with us and telling us about The Sacred Cipher. Readers, Terry has offered to give a copy of his novel to the winner of our drawing on Monday, December 28. To enter, leave a comment for Terry, below. Leave your email address, in case you win, like so: trish[at]trishperry[dot]com.

Check out my interviews of Linore Rose Burkard and Randy Ingermanson, below. Leave a comment for Linore below her interview and be entered to win a copy of her latest novel, The Country House Courtship, on Christmas Eve. If you subscribe to my blog, at right (or if you're already subscribed), you'll be entered an additional time to this drawing and all future drawings.

Randy's new release, Writing Fiction for Dummies, would make an excellent addition to the library of any new or experienced fiction writer. Leave a comment for Randy below his interview, and I'll enter your name in my New Year's Eve drawing for Syrie James' novel The Lost Memoirs of Jane Austen.

Annoying legal disclaimer: drawings void where prohibited; open only to U.S. residents; the odds of winning depend upon the number of participants.

Thursday, December 17, 2009

Linore Rose Burkard and Free Books!

A regency miss seeks the glamour of a London Season and a wealthy match, but finds herself drawn to a handsome country vicar, which threatens to ruin all her plans.

Before we revisit today's featured author, I want to announce that the winner of the drawing for The Christmas Edition, by Robin Shope, is:

kimberly_johnson503@ . . .

Congratulations! I'll contact you today for your snail mail address, and we'll get your book to you right away. I encourage readers to keep commenting and/or subscribe at right in order to participate in future book give-aways!

And now let's revisit with novelist Linore Rose Burkard, author of The Country House Courtship (Harvest House Publishers, January 2010).

PhotobucketLinore Rose Burkard writes Inspirational Romance for the Jane Austen Soul--Christian Regencies. Her first two books in the Regency Series, Before the Season Ends and The House in Grosvenor Square, are already reader favorites. Country House Courtship rounds out the series, but Linore has other titles planned which share the regency setting. Fans of her books or the regency can receive a free monthly newsletter (Regency Reflections) by signing up at her website. Each issue includes a free download.

Please tell us a bit more about the plot of your novel.

PhotobucketBeatrice Forsythe, now all of seventeen, fully expects to snag a wealthy husband when she hits London by storm for the coming Season. After all, her sister Ariana married the Paragon, Mr. Mornay! With that accomplishment in the family, how could she fail to make a high match? But she doesn't count on renewing an acquaintance with a handsome young vicar while visiting her sister's country estate. Yet her plans are safe--until Ariana falls gravely ill and nothing is as it should be. Soon, hearts are bared and secrets come to light, and in the end a country house courtship like no other has taken place!

Which character in your novel most interested you while you wrote?

Beatrice, the heroine, falls into the classic dilemma of being torn between what her head tells her and what her heart knows to be true--two very different things. She has every reason to hope she'll be introduced into the highest circles of society, and therefore thinks she can make a wealthy match as Ariana did; but when her heart slowly learns that the perfect husband may not be what she had in mind at all, she has to choose whether to follow her dreams--or make new ones. It's a thing that arises in the life of nearly every one in some form or another, and therefore is always compelling. I loved the way Beatrice had to be convinced of where her best interests lay, and how she gradually was drawn to choosing the "better thing."

Why will readers enjoy your novel?

Like the other novels in this series, Country House is set during the Regency; So all the fun of the customs and costumes, the morals and manners, the upper class and the servants, is there. Unlike the other two, the setting for this one is a quintessential English country estate, which is a change of pace, and really fun and interesting. Plus, the characters that readers already know and love are here, being themselves, and yet faced with new challenges, which reveals them in a new way. I particularly enjoyed seeing how Ariana and Phillip settle down into married life, while maintaining that fierce attachment they have for each other.

If you were the casting director for the film version of your novel, who would play your lead roles?

PhotobucketI love Johnny Depp and I'm sure he would make a wonderful Mr. Mornay, but recently we ran a poll on this very question, and readers chose Elliot Cowan (Mr. Darcy from, Lost in Austen).

PhotobucketI still haven't seen that series, but I'm eager to. I hadn't seen this actor before, and I found myself surfing longer than necessary. Just had to share the shot of a more modern version of the guy. Your readers are sharp ladies, Linore.

How about your other characters?


PhotobucketFor Ariana, I like the model on the bookcovers but it looks like readers are going for Rosamund Pike (we're doing the poll right now, and so far Rosamund is the favorite by far).

PhotobucketIf Minnie Driver was ten years younger, she'd be a blast as Beatrice.

PhotobucketAnd Orlando Bloom would be a Mr. O'Brien to swoon for.

What a gorgeous cast!

When you visited us last, you told us your writing strengths and weaknesses were thinking up the stories and then struggling to bring them to life, respectively. Has that changed in any fashion?


I'm not sure if my strengths and weaknesses have changed, but my assessment of them has. I now think a weakness of mine as a writer, at least when I'm planning a book, is knowing when to begin a story; I always want to start early, and gradually work into the main conflict. I usually write two to four "first" chapters before deciding which one is the real start of the story, so the others get scrapped. But the writing is probably still worthwhile as it helps me know more of the backstory, and understand the characters better.

I'm asking my December authors to finish the following statement as though they were planning on writing a story with this opening:

Ella planned to lie about where she had been, but . . . during the long drive home she listened to a radio show on How to Be Authentic, and the show host actually talked her out of it! She used scripture quotes to back up her points, and in the end, Ella knew she could no longer lie to her room-mate. She'd have to tell the truth, come what may.

What are you working on now?

A new sort of novel for me; it's a time-travel! But it's not a sci-fi or thriller, it's still an inspirational romance. My readers are going to love this hero.

Where else can readers find you or your writing online?

My website: www.LinoreRoseBurkard.com has many wonderful free pdf's for readers, which anyone can access without signing up or leaving their email. And my books are in bookstores, or available at any online bookseller, like Amazon or Christianbook.com. By the way, The Country House Courtship is available for pre-order on Amazon for under $10, which is the lowest price I've seen on any of my books.

Thank you, Trish!

Thank you, Linore, for visiting with us again and telling us about The Country House Courtship. Readers, Linore has offered to give a copy of her novel to the winner of our drawing on Christmas Eve. To enter, leave a comment for Linore, below. Leave your email address, in case you win, like so: trish[at]trishperry[dot]com.

Check out my interviews of Susan Page Davis and Randy Ingermanson, below. Leave a comment for Susan below her interview and be entered to win a copy of her latest novel, The Sheriff's Surrender, on Monday, December 21. If you subscribe to my blog, at right (or if you're already subscribed), you'll be entered an additional time to this drawing and all future drawings.

Randy's new release, Writing Fiction for Dummies, would make an excellent addition to the library of any new or experienced fiction writer. Leave a comment for Randy below his interview, and I'll enter your name in my New Year's Eve drawing for Syrie James' novel The Lost Memoirs of Jane Austen.

Annoying legal disclaimer: drawings void where prohibited; open only to U.S. residents; the odds of winning depend upon the number of participants.

Monday, December 14, 2009

Susan Page Davis and Free Books!

The men of Fergus aren't keeping the town safe, so a group of feisty women take matters into their own hands.

Before we revisit today's featured author, I want to announce that the winner of the drawing for Field of Danger, by Ramona Richards, is:

ppwbookplace@ . . .

Congratulations! I'll contact you today for your snail mail address, and we'll get your book to you right away. I encourage readers to keep commenting and/or subscribe at right in order to participate in future book give-aways!

And now let's revisit with novelist Susan Page Davis, author of The Sheriff's Surrender (Barbour Publishing, December 2009), the first book in Susan's new series, The Ladies' Shooting Club.

PhotobucketSusan Page Davis is a native of Maine. She's the author of more than two dozen novels, mostly in the historical romance and romantic suspense genres. Her husband Jim is a retired news editor, and two of their six children still live at home. They also have six far-flung grandchildren. Two live in Idaho, so they got to visit them when Susan went west to do research for this series. Jim is an Oregon native, and they lived out there for a while, early in their marriage, so Susan feels comfortable writing stories set on both sides of the Mississippi.

Please tell us a bit more about the plot of The Sheriff's Surrender.

PhotobucketGert Dooley can shoot the tail feathers off a jay at a hundred yards, but she wants Ethan Chapman to see that there's more to her than her marksmanship.

When the town's sheriff is murdered and Ethan is named his replacement, the men of Fergus can't find the killer. More crimes frighten the women. Gert forms the Ladies' Shooting Club, teaching the ladies to defend their businesses, homes, and families. The men are at first amused, then riled up. Most of them want their women back in the kitchen. Will Ethan bow to pressure and put the shooting club out of commission, or will he surrender his heart to one crack shot lady?

A second murder occurs, and this time the victim is a member of the club. Will Ethan and his men stop the killer? Or will that honor belong to the Ladies' Shooting Club?

Which character in your novel most interested you while you wrote?

Gert Dooley, who organizes the club, is in some ways a naive, sheltered young woman. She came from Maine at the age of 16 to keep house for her brother, the gunsmith. She's lived in the Idaho boomtown-gone-bust for eight years now, but she hasn't grown close to anyone except her brother. In this book, she blossoms into a leader and a caring member of the community. And she falls in love.

Why will readers enjoy your novel?

Hmm, mystery, romance, quirky characters you won't soon forget. What's not to like?

I have to agree with you there, Susan. I'm not normally a big reader of Westerns, but this storyline and the way Gert's character develops sound intriguing.

This month we’re looking at writing prompts. Pretend you have to start a story with these words, and give us an idea of how you would end this first sentence:


Ella planned to lie about where she had been, but . . . she scrapped that plan when she realized she'd been followed.

You often travel in connection with your books. What's the most recent trip you’ve taken for book research?

Jim and I went to Idaho in July to research the next book in this series (The Gunsmith's Gallantry, coming next June). With our daughter, Amy, we took a road trip in southwestern Idaho and visited historic Silver City and other sites pertinent to the mining era of that area.

What is the last book you read that moved you?

Harry Kraus's Perfect gave me a new perspective on how a book "must" end. Personally, I'm still a happy ending proponent, but this one was appropriate and kept me thinking about the book for weeks.

Readers, here's the link for Perfect, in case you're interested.

What are you working on now, Susan?


A historical suspense (with romance, of course) set in 1915. The working title is The Tourmaline Cipher (subject to change), and it's due out in July, 2010 from Summerside.

Where else can readers find you or your writing online?

Come visit my Website. You can view a book trailer for The Sheriff's Surrender on my historicals page, and link to buy it there, or go directly to Christian Book Distributors. I give away at least one free book on my website each month, so sign up for the hassle-free drawing on my home page. I'm also known to pop in at Bustles and Spurs and ShoutLife, and I have an author page at Amazon.

Thank you, Susan, for visiting with us again and telling us about The Sheriff's Surrender. Readers, Susan has offered to give a copy of her novel to the winner of our drawing on Monday, December 21. To enter, leave a comment for Susan, below. Leave your email address, in case you win, like so: trish[at]trishperry[dot]com.

Check out my interviews of Robin Shope and Randy Ingermanson, below. Leave a comment for Robin below her interview and be entered to win a copy of her latest novel, The Christmas Edition, on Thursday, December 17. If you subscribe to my blog, at right (or if you're already subscribed), you'll be entered an additional time to this drawing and all future drawings.

Randy's new release, Writing Fiction for Dummies, would make an excellent addition to the library of any new or experienced fiction writer. Leave a comment for Randy below his interview, and I'll enter your name in my New Year's Eve drawing for Syrie James' novel The Lost Memoirs of Jane Austen.

Annoying legal disclaimer: drawings void where prohibited; open only to U.S. residents; the odds of winning depend upon the number of participants.

Check back this Thursday, when we'll revisit with Linore Rose Burkard, author of The Country House Courtship.

Thursday, December 10, 2009

Robin Shope and Free Books!

Will truth be found where a lie began?

Today we're revisiting novelits Robin Shope, author of The Christmas Edition (White Rose Publishing, 2008). Robin's novel is currently being made into a film!

Robin, please tell us about yourself.

PhotobucketI am a Christian who puts her best efforts into an ordinary life in order to accomplish something extraordinary. After serving overseas as a missionary, I chose the classroom for my next challenge. Twenty-five years later, I am still here--it's home. Presently, I am the Special Education Coordinator at a county juvenile facility for teens. My days are busy. So are my nights. That is when I find time to write. For the last fifteen years I have been writing articles and short stories. In the last seven years, I have had seven fictional books and one eBook published.

Please tell us a bit more about the plot of The Christmas Edition.

PhotobucketLucy Collins has given up on Christmas since the painful break-up with her fiance. Things only get worse when a large newspaper begins to set up shop and threatens the livelihood of the family run business, The Turtle Creek Newspaper. At the staff Christmas party, Lucy says a prayer and what seems to be the answer appears at the front door to apply for the editor position. The newspaper needs new life and energy, so this most critical position goes to Joe McNamara. Not only is he a natural when it comes to the written word, but he is also gifted with ideas about keeping the newspaper afloat. However, Joe has secrets of his own that he keeps from Lucy. If she finds out, then what looks like a promising relationship will unravel, but it's Christmas time, the season of rebirth and miracles. Will the spirit of celebration be enough to heal two hearts? Or will the reality of deception bring down Christmas and the newspaper?

Which character in your novel most interested you while you wrote?

Although I loved creating Lucy, a heroine who is sweet, uncomplicated, pretty and talented, it's Joe who was fun to write. Definitely, he is my favorite character for many reasons. First of all, he is dark and brooding with a questionable past. Joe is multi-layered. Right off the bat, the reader knows he has come to town with many issues to hide. A new setting for his life can't keep his problems from bubbling to the surface. On the surface, he looks and sounds good, but what is he hiding? Joe starts out as a tormented character. He ends up changed. What happened to him in Turtle Creek that was life altering?

Why do readers enjoy your novel?

I posted this question on FB and here are a few of the responses:

Robin Shope is a master storyteller. Whether she is writing intrigue or romance, Robin captures the attention of her readers and draws them into her stories. Robin's witty sense of humor shines through each of her books as well. Her characters are likeable and believable and her plots are complex. -- Kelly Kiggins-Lund, Philadelphia Christian Books Examiner

Robin writes in much the same way a painter paints. Her descriptions put you in each scene, being able to see the colors, feel the furniture and fabric, and sense the emotions. The vivid descriptions almost create a movie like environment during your reading. The characters are just like your neighbors, but they live in the country and encounter country related plot twists and issues. Her books are fun reads. -- John Friedman, Chicago attorney.

Well . . . I enjoy them because they are well written! The characters are fun and flawed and you keep us guessing at what will transpire. Which I love! I always appreciate your great dialog too. Along with all that you get a spiritual perspective. What can I say . . . you do great work!! If it has your name on it you're in for a great story. -- Sherry Kuhn, reader.

Even though this book was released in 2008, we're revisiting it because you're working on a film version of The Christmas Edition. Have you cast the roles for your hero and heroine yet? Do you have pictures of them that we can post?

My role as an author is to open my hands and allow my book The Christmas Edition go so it can evolve into the creative movie of Journey to Paradise. Steven Zambo, producer/director of Salty Earth Pictures, and his team members, are casting and shooting the movie this winter in Fort Atkinson, Wisconsin. From time to time, Steven posts pictures of the sets on Facebook and he invites everyone to become a fan of Journey to Paradise Movie. There are updates and pictures posted on the movie’s page and my page.

Most of us haven't embarked on film versions of our books. What can you tell us about your experience so far with this project? How extensive is your involvement?

I wrote the book and Steven wrote the screen play. Afterwards he sent it to me, holding his breath until I finished reading it. Even though the movie version is a bit different from the book, I loved it! I am so pleased but there are some changes. The book is set in the fictional town of Turtle Creek, Wisconsin in a newspaper office whereas the movie version is set in a real town by the name of Paradise, Wisconsin at a TV station. I am additionally thrilled because the way the script reads, my sequel books, PhotobucketThe Valentine Edition and PhotobucketThe Easter Edition, fits like a glove for sequel movies.

Do you still anticipate the film’s release in December of 2010? What will that release entail?

Everything is on schedule for the movie's release the fall of 2010. Details are being worked out as we speak.

Where else can readers find you or your writing online? Please include the link for purchasing The Christmas Edition.

Come and visit me on Facebook and also my blog, The Serial Writings of Robin Shope

To purchase the book: Amazon


Thank you, Robin, for visiting with us again and telling us about your novel and film. Readers, Robin has offered to give a copy of her novel, The Christmas Edition, to the winner of our drawing on Monday, December 14. To enter, leave a comment for Robin, below. Leave your email address, in case you win, like so: trish[at]trishperry[dot]com.

Check out my interviews of Ramona Richards and Randy Ingermanson, below. Leave a comment for Ramona below her interview and be entered to win a copy of her latest novel, Field of Danger on Monday, December 14. If you subscribe to my blog, at right (or if you're already subscribed), you'll be entered an additional time to this drawing and all future drawings.

Randy's new release, Writing Fiction for Dummies, is a must have for new and experienced fiction writers alike. Leave a comment for Randy below his interview, and I'll enter your name in my New Year's Eve drawing for Syrie James' novel The Lost Memoirs of Jane Austen.

Annoying legal disclaimer: drawings void where prohibited; open only to U.S. residents; the odds of winning depend upon the number of participants.

Check back this Monday, when we'll revisit with Susan Page Davis, author of The Sheriff's Surrender.

Tuesday, December 8, 2009

Ramona Richards and Free Books!

When April Presley can't remember the details of the murder she witnessed, sheriff's deputy Daniel Rivers is charged with helping her recall the event--and protect her from the relentless killer determined to silence her before she does.

Before we revisit today's featured author, I want to announce that the winner of the drawing for Fools Rush In, by Janice Thompson, is:

chellegoodson@ . . .

Congratulations! I'll contact you today for your snail mail address, and we'll get your book to you right away. I encourage readers to keep commenting and/or subscribe at right in order to participate in future book give-aways!

And now let's revisit with novelist Ramona Richards, author of Field of Danger (Love Inspired Suspense, Steeple Hill, December 2009).

PhotobucketRamona Richards, an award-winning editor, speaker, and author, started writing as a child and sold her first story in her 20s. After 25 years as an editor, she returned to writing fiction, and her first three Steeple Hill novels, including The Taking of Carly Bradford, received 4-1/2 stars from Romantic Times magazine.

In 2008, her proposal for the inspirational suspense novel Reclaiming Daisy Doe won the From the Heart Romance Writers Best Proposal Contest (the Lories). The Advanced Writers and Speakers Association (AWSA) nominated her for both Best Editor of the Year (2008) and Best Fiction Editor of the Year (2003).

Ramona is a member of the Romance Writers of America and The American Christian Fiction Writers. She lives with her daughter Rachel near Nashville, and she occasionally escapes by scuba diving, hiking, dancing, and going to movies and bookstores.

You're a busy, accomplished woman, Ramona! What else can you tell us about Field of Danger?

Photobucket"Who killed my father?"

Eyewitness to a murder, April Presley wants to answer the deputy sheriff's harrowing question. But she can't. She barely caught a glimpse of the crime through the deep Tennessee cornfield, and cannot recall anything to help the investigation. Or can she? Daniel Rivers is certain that April remembers more of his father's death than she realizes. And the killer agrees.

In the race to uncover April's missing memory before the killer finds her, Daniel is the only one she can trust to keep her safe. Yet will he stay by her side when the shocking truth is unveiled?

Which character in your novel most interested you while you wrote?

April. She's overcome some unbelievable hardships and abuse, and she'd just started putting her life back together when she sees her best friend and neighbor shot. Letting her absorb that shock while Daniel looks out for her, then seeing her bounce back to her strength was a joy to write.

Why will readers enjoy your novel?

It's a rapid-fire page turner of a mystery, but the growth of the romance between April and Daniel reminds us of the ups-and-downs of falling in love, the little debates you have with yourself while it's happening, and the joy of learning to cherish another person.

If you were the casting director for the film version of your novel, who would play your lead roles?

PhotobucketApril--tall, athletic, and sweet--would have to be Amanda Righetti from The Mentalist. She's just perfect.

PhotobucketDaniel was a harder choice until a friend who'd read the manuscript sent me a picture of David Boreanaz. She thought he was an ideal fit, and I had to agree.

This month we're looking at writing prompts. Pretend you have to start a story with these words, and give us an idea of how you would end this first sentence:

Ella planned to lie about where she had been, but . . .
the sharp tack of her conscious made her a lousy liar, even if the body at her feet hadn't been a dead giveaway to her recent whereabouts.

It's fun to watch how writers in different genres vary in their approach to that one.

What facet of the writing craft comes easiest to you? What do you struggle with?


The easiest is the character development. People fascinate me, and I love putting together the intricacies of a new hero or heroine. The hardest is always the plot and building in the suspense.

I can especially imagine how hard plot development would be for a suspense writer. I simply do not know how you guys do it, time and again.

Someone has just handed you a box containing exactly what you need at this moment in time. It’s not food. What’s in the box?


Money. (I am, after all, a freelance writer!)

Funny! And so sadly true.

What is the last book you read that moved you? How did it affect you?


Dorothy Dunnett's Checkmate. It's part of the Lymond series, and by the time I got to the last book, she'd totally enthralled me with her story and engaged my heart with her characters. When the climax of that book hit, I couldn't breathe, couldn't move. It's just a moment you never forget.

I've decided I'm going to start adding the Amazon link for the books recommended by authors from now on, whenever possible. So here's the link for Checkmate.

What are you working on now?

The sequel to Field of Danger. House of Secrets is about April's sister June and the Bell County Sheriff, Ray Taylor.

Where else can readers find you or your writing online? Please include the link for purchasing your book.

I can be found on my website (www.ramonarichards.com) (where there are excerpts from my writing), Facebook, and Twitter. Field of Danger can be ordered from any of the major sites, including Amazon and Christianbook.

Thank you, Ramona, for visiting with us again and telling us about your novel. Readers, Ramona has offered to give a copy of her novel to the winner of our drawing on Monday, December 14. To enter, leave a comment for Ramona, below. Leave your email address, in case you win, like so: trish[at]trishperry[dot]com. If you subscribe to my blog, at right (or if you're already subscribed), you'll be entered an additional time to this drawing and all future drawings.

Check out my interview of Randy Ingermanson, below. Randy's new release, Writing Fiction for Dummies, is a must have for new and experienced fiction writers alike. Leave a comment for Randy below his interview, and I'll enter your name in my New Year's Eve drawing for Syrie James' novel The Lost Memoirs of Jane Austen.

Annoying legal disclaimer: drawings void where prohibited; open only to U.S. residents; the odds of winning depend upon the number of participants.

Check back this Thursday, when we'll meet Robin Shope, author of The Christmas Edition.

Monday, December 7, 2009

Randy Ingermanson and Free Books!

PhotobucketSo you want to write a novel? Great! But is that all you want to do? After all, anybody can type a bunch of words and call it a novel. The trick is writing one that's good enough to get published.

This book is for fiction writers who want to write an excellent novel and get it published--and get paid a decent wage for it. That's a tough, demanding goal, but it's entirely doable if you tackle it intelligently. In
Writing Fiction for Dummies, Randy Ingermanson and Peter Economy teach you all the skills you must master in order to get published.


Readers, today is the launch date for author Randy Ingermanson's excellent How-To book, Writing Fiction for Dummies. And Randy has a special offer for early purchasers: Between December 7 and December 9, if you visit Randy's web site, you'll see some great incentives to buy Writing Fiction for Dummies on Amazon before midnight on Wednesday night, December 9.

Before you dash over there, let's take a look at Randy, his co-author Peter Economy, and their new release.

PhotobucketRandy Ingermanson was both the class nerd and the class clown. He is the award-winning author of six novels and is known around the world as "the Snowflake Guy" in honor of his famous "Snowflake method" of designing a novel. Randy earned a Ph.D. in physics from UC Berkeley and writes fiction set at "the intersection of Faith Avenue and Science Boulevard." It's a dangerous part of town with lots of high-speed collisions and flying glass. Randy publishes the world's largest electronic magazine on how to write fiction, the Advanced Fiction Writing E-zine. You can learn more about him at www.AdvancedFictionWriting.com and also www.Ingermanson.com.

Randy's coauthor on the book is Peter Economy. Peter is not a fiction writer or fiction teacher. He's a veteran of about 12 Dummies books. The publisher asked him to find a coauthor and write the book. He chose Randy to be his coauthor. "Obviously," Randy says, "he's an intelligent and discerning guy."

Randy, As you wrote Writing Fiction for Dummies, what audience did you have in mind?

Our main audience that we wrote the book especially for is the "freshman" writer. A "freshman" is a writer who hasn't been writing long and is still trying to figure out this wretched, wonderful, wacky game of fiction writing. So we decided that if a writer has never bought a single book on how to write fiction, then this should be the first book that he or she needs.

But I discovered as I wrote the book that it isn't just for "freshman" writers. I discovered that this book is also for me. In just about every chapter, I learned something new and exciting about the craft of writing. Or I thought of a new way to say something that I'd been trying to say clearly for years. I didn't expect that, but that's how it turned out. So I have this sneaking suspicion that many of my multi-published author friends are going to find a fistful of new insights in the book.

I know I'm eager to read it. I'm constantly learning new tidbits from your Advanced Fiction Writing e-zine.

I'm sure many of my readers are familiar with your Snowflake Method and your Advanced Fiction Writing Blog. How differently does Writing Fiction for Dummies approach fiction writing?


Writing Fiction for Dummies really takes the same approach that I've always taken to writing fiction. It gathers together every topic I've been teaching for 9 years, and puts it all together in one convenient book. It's not as extensive as my lecture series are. No 384 page book could cover things in that level of detail. The book boils everything I've ever taught down to the essentials, but it also covers a wider range of topics than I've covered in the past.

I have a chapter in the book that reviews the Snowflake method, of course. And many of the articles that I've previously posted in my e-zine or on my blog have contributed ideas to the book. But I should make it clear that the book is almost entirely new in presentation. I've taken a few examples from my previous lectures, but virtually the entire text of the book was written fresh. That's why I learned so many new things--because I started with a blank page.

I should also say that certain topics in the book were new topics that I'd never covered before. Until I wrote this book, I had never written anything on how to strategically define your target audience and your category. That's essential to writing a marketable novel, but I had never taught on that until now.

I also completely rethought some of the material that I've been using for years that I learned from Dwight Swain, a master fiction teacher of many years ago. Swain's ideas are powerful, but I found that many of my students over the years got confused by certain ambiguities in the words. I couldn't find any book anywhere that had the words I needed for certain concepts. So I created a few new terms of my own. I hope the writing community will accept these new terms.

One thing that was very new in this book for me was to use fictional methods to teach fiction. In numerous places in the book, I write a little snippet of a scene to teach a concept. It was fun. If you string each of the snippets together, they actually form a larger story in which the reader moves from hopeful writer to published author to endangered celebrity. I hope that my readers will remember these little fictitious snippets, and in doing so, remember the concepts.

And how does Writing Fiction for Dummies differ from the other writing books out there?

Writing Fiction for Dummies sounds like me speaking. It's written completely in my voice.So far as I know, none of those other books do that. I have a weird way of looking at the world, and that comes through in my teaching.

Of course, I cover all the usual stuff. Storyworld. Characters. Plot. Theme. But I teach all these classic topics in my own twisted way.

One thing that I do that's fairly unusual is to always keep one eye on marketing. I teach the craft of writing, but at every stage, I try to explain WHY it's so important--because good craft sells copies. The successful novelist writes to entertain the reader. If your fiction is entertaining, you'll sell copies. It's that simple.

What was your greatest challenge in writing this book? Your greatest pleasure?

Let's face it--I hate being edited. I always imagine that when I've written my first draft, it's perfect and the editor just needs to rubber-stamp it with the words "Perfect In Every Detail."

Tragically, that never happens. So it was a challenge to work with the editor to make it better. That's always my big challenge. I'm happy to say that the book is a lot better now than when I first turned it in.

My greatest pleasure in writing the book was in learning new things. I learned a lot of new things this time working through the material. Most of them were little things. I think they'll make me a better writer. They say that if you really want to learn a subject, then teach it. That's true.

I actually changed my mind on something fairly fundamental that I've been teaching for years. I was a little shocked when I realized that a strongly held belief of mine wasn't necessarily true. So I changed my tune. I won't tell you what belief I changed, but I'll give you a hint: p. 210, top paragraph.

Ah, ever the man of mystery! Now we all have to buy the book or suffer ignorance. Of course, that would have been the case despite your tease, no?

Just for that lone, sadly uninformed person out there, tell us what other books you've published.


I'll give you a piece of doggerel just for that:

Breathes there a man with soul so dead,
who never to himself hath said,
"That Randy is a funny twit,
I wonder what he might have writ."


I've written three time-travel novels set in ancient Jerusalem:
Transgression, Premonition, and Retribution.

I've written two futuristic Mars novels with John Olson:
Oxygen, and The Fifth Man.

I've written one contemporary suspense novel:
Double Vision.

I've written a nonfiction book examining the alleged Bible Code:
Who Wrote the Bible Code?

What's next on the writing horizon for you?

I'm currently planning to wrap up my product lineup of "how to write fiction" courses that I sell on my web site. I'm also working on a top secret web site with John Olson. I could tell you all about it, but John would remove my kneecaps. I like my kneecaps, so . . .

I'll just say it'll be cool. I also have a couple of ideas for novel series that I'm composting in my little brain. When they're ready, I'll start writing them. Until then, well, honestly, compost doesn't look all that appetizing, so it's probably best to keep them out of sight for the time being.

How can readers and writers find you online?

Google me. Or see my two web sites at: www.AdvancedFictionWriting.com and www.Ingermanson.com

Thanks, Trish!

Thank you, Randy. I can't wait to read your latest! Readers, remember to act quickly to take advantage of Randy's special offer when you order Writing Fiction for Dummies! Visit his website before midnight, December 9.

While I don't have a copy of Writing Fiction for Dummies to give away, I will be happy to add your name to my New Year's Day drawing for The Lost Memoirs of Jane Austen if you leave a comment for Randy, below. That's two chances so far to enter your name in the drawing: here and HERE. I'll draw a name from commenters only, this time around.

I did have a drawing this morning, however, for commenters and subscribers alike, for Margaret Daley's Christmas novel, Together for the Holidays. The winner is:

kalea_kane@ . . .


Congratulations! I'll contact you today for your snail mail address, and we'll get your book to you right away. I encourage readers to keep commenting and/or subscribe at right in order to participate in future book give-aways!

Don't forget to check out my interview of Janice Thompson, author of Fools Rush In, below. She'll give away a signed copy of her book this Thursday. Leave a comment and/or subscribe at right to enter.

Annoying legal disclaimer: drawings void where prohibited; open only to U.S. residents; the odds of winning depend upon the number of participants.

Tomorrow I plan to feature novelist Ramona Richards, author of Field of Danger.

Saturday, December 5, 2009

The Lost Memoirs of Jane Austen and Free Books!

Why I feel the sudden urge to relate, in pen and ink, a relationship of the most personal nature, which I have never before acknowledged, I cannot say.

PhotobucketSo begins The Lost Memoirs of Jane Austen, by Syrie James. This was the last of the items I committed to read or view in the Everything Austen Challenge, which has run for the past six months.

I enjoyed this novel so much more than I expected to, and I highly recommend it to all Austen fans. If you've read any of Austen's novels or watched the film renditions of them, you'll recognize a number of circumstances in this fictional romantic adventure.

In the same way the film Shakespeare in Love took license with Shakespeare's personal life, James imagines a romance for Jane.

When researching Austen's life, James discovered a two-year gap in her letters. It is common knowledge that Jane's sister, Cassandra, destroyed any of Jane's letters she felt Jane might have preferred be kept private after her death. With regard to the two-year gap, James says, "I decided to invent a grand romance for our beloved Jane, with a legitimate but ultimately heartbreaking reason as to why they did not marry, and why the world never knew about him."

The book is written in Austen's voice, and James does an excellent job of capturing the style of Austen's novels. I found myself drawn in very easily and picturing Jane and her love, Mr. Ashford, as if I were watching them on the big screen.


PhotobucketI saw Jane as being played by the lovely actress Emily Blunt.

Photobucket







PhotobucketAnd for Mr. Ashton, I envisioned the handsome James Purefoy.
PhotobucketPhotobucket

Even though history shows that Jane Austen never married, and only her brief flirtation with James LeFroy is certain, her sister Cassandra did mention Jane's unspecified seaside romance, according to Syrie James. Despite the fact that any romance clearly ended in failure for one reason or another, one reads The Lost Memoirs wishing they were true. For an author to write such memorably romantic stories, one would hope she had a chance to experience the joy of romance firsthand. Considering the joy her novels have given to so many romantics, it's the least Jane deserved.

If you'd like to see who posted what in the Everything Austen Challenge, here's the link: Stephanie's Written Word.

I'd love to give away my copy of this fine novel. If you'd like to enter the drawing--I'll pick a winning name on New Year's Eve--just leave a comment about anything Austen, below. Leave your email address, in case you win, like so: trish[at]trishperry[dot]com. This drawing will only be for those who comment, not including my subscribers. So your chances of winning will be greater!

Don't forget to check out my interview of Janice Thompson, author of Fools Rush In, below. She'll give away a signed copy of her book this Thursday. Leave a comment and/or subscribe at right to enter.

Annoying legal disclaimer: drawings void where prohibited; open only to U.S. residents; the odds of winning depend upon the number of participants.
 

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