WHAT'S IT GOING TO BE?

What book should you read next? What words should you write next? Whether you're a reader, a writer, or both, you need look no further for ideas and pointers to help you make up your mind. You might even get your next book for free--and signed by the author!

Sometimes I even give away my own novels. My Inspirational romances and devotionals are pictured below and are detailed on my Books page. You can always count on a trace of humor in my novels and nonfiction. Whether you're a teen or a woman mature in years, I think these stories will ring true.

Read on, and discover some of today's most appealing Christian novelists, their latest books, and their words of wisdom and imagination. Enjoy!

Thursday, February 26, 2009

Lyn Cote and Free Books!

When a New Orleans lady and a half-breed scout enter 1821 Mexican Texas together, two armies, marauding Comanche, and a traitor in their midst stand between them and their destination.

Before we meet today's featured author, I want to announce that the winner of Brandt Dobson's novel, Daniels' Den, is:

hollymag@ . . .

Congratulations! I'll contact you today for your snail mail address, and we'll get your book to you right away. I encourage readers to keep commenting and/or subscribe at right in order to participate in future book give-aways!

And now let's meet novelist Lyn Cote, author of The Desires of Her Heart (Texas: Star of Destiny series, Avon Inspire, February 2009).

PhotobucketWhen Lyn Cote became a mother, she gave up teaching, and while raising a son and a daughter, she began working on her first novel. Long years of rejection followed. Finally in 1997, Lyn got "the call." Her first book, Never Alone, was chosen by Steeple Hill. Lyn has had over twenty-five novels published since then. In 2006 Lyn's book, Chloe, was a finalist for the RITA, one of the highest awards in the romance genre. Lyn's brand "Strong Women, Brave Stories," always includes three elements: a strong heroine who is a passionate participant in her times, authentic historical detail, and a multicultural cast of characters. Now, Lyn spends her days writing books that show the power of divine as well as human love.

Please tell us a bit more about the plot of The Desires of Her Heart, Lyn.

PhotobucketIn 1821, Dorritt Mott is a woman ahead of her time. When her family is forced to leave New Orleans, she meets Quinn and knows she needs him to arrive safely at their destination. The New Orleans lady and the half-breed scout become unlikely allies on the trek to the Austin settlement in Texas. Two armies, marauding Comanche, and a traitor in their midst stand between them and their destination. All Dorritt thinks she wants is her own independence, but is it possible that she will gain the unrecognized desires of her heart? And teach Quinn to enlarge his vision also?

Which character in your novel most interested you while you wrote? Why?

My hero and heroine intrigued me. Both of them do not fit in their society at the time. Quinn is very intelligent and skilled, multi-lingual but because of his Cherokee blood, he is looked down on. Dorritt is well educated, also extremely intelligent, capable, but because she is a female, she is looked down on. Can you imagine how difficult that was to swallow? Well, Quinn has dealt with this by keeping to the edges of "civilization" and sticking with people who know him. Dorritt is trying to find a way to find her independence from her family and some of the strictures on woman of the time.

Why will readers enjoy your novel?

I always try to write a novel that refuses to be put down and walked away from. I like to receive emails from readers who complain that I made them lose sleep! (I'm just mean I guess.) And I like a lot of action and situations that push my hero and heroine far past their comfort zones. That's when true character comes out in fiction and real life.

If you were the casting director for the film version of your novel, who would play your lead roles?

PhotobucketHugh Jackman for Quinn.

And Cate Blanchett for Dorritt. Photobucket

PhotobucketQuinn's friend Ash would be a perfect role for Samuel L Jackson.

What facet of the writing craft comes easiest to you? Explain.

I'm a storyteller first and foremost. Coming up with a new story idea is fun.

What do you struggle with in your writing?

The hardest part of writing is having to put words on a page which accurately portray what is happening in my imagination. Words are slippery fish and just won't settle down. They keep wiggling!

I hear you, Lyn!

We're taking a look at point of view this month. Say a new writer tells you she's going to write her novel using the omniscient point of view. In three sentences or less, give her your thoughts on that idea.


My advice depends on the writer. She might be the one who can do omniscient well. However, I would warn her that this POV is out of favor. I never use it.

And since Lyn's interview is the last one addressing POV, I'll add my agreement to the predominance of writer opinions listed here this month. Omniscient POV is difficult to do well, because the reader is never in one character's mind/heart/soul long enough to truly connect. It's much like watching TV with a man who is holding the remote (there's no point pretending women do this, too). Just as you start to get into one show, he switches channels on you. So you try to settle into the new choice, and BAM! He switches again.

It's better to stick with one character's experience of the scene or chapter. Your readers will thank you (and love your books) for it!


Back to Lyn!

Choose an inanimate object to represent you, Lyn. Explain what you have in common with that object.


Well, a perfect day for me is sitting in the summer shade and reading a good book. So how about my being the book this time? GRIN

Ah, but which book are you? What is the last book you read that impacted you? How did it affect you?

Kathy Herman's The Real Enemy that will come out in March from David C Cook. It's romantic suspense and the first in the Sophie Trace Trilogy. First and foremost it was a puzzler of a mystery, which I love, and then it had a unique heroine with her own problems to deal with.

What are you working on now?

I'm writing the third story in my Gabriel Sister series for Love Inspired Historical. This series features three Quaker sisters, Verity, Felicity, and Mercy who each feel they have been given a mission from God to help heal the US after the Civil War. Drop by my website (www.lyncote.net) and view the trailer I made myself for Verity's story which was out in December 2008. Felicity debuts December 2009 and Mercy in December 2010.

Where else can readers find you or your writing online? Please include the link for purchasing your book.

All my books are for sale on my website. Also I have just started my own blog, www.strongwomenbravestories.blogspot.com, where readers can read and have posted the stories of their strength or of women in their family or women whom they have known. Authors who guest usually talk about their latest heroine and then share some of their life story. I only do it on Tuesday and Thursday, but I have received some amazing stories in only a few months.

May is going to be my blog's MEGA MONTH since it has Mother's Day. I will be asking for readers to send me stories to post (I will edit if needed); I will be giving away a MEGA gift basket to anyone who posts a story or a comment; I am also offering to send a lovely Mother's Day postcard to anyone a person requests me to. So I hope readers will drop by and join the fun!

Thanks, Trish, for interviewing me. This has been FUN!

Thanks, Lyn, for telling us about yourself and The Desires of Her Heart. Readers, Lyn has offered to sign a copy of her novel for the winner of our drawing on Thursday, March 5. To enter, leave a comment for Lyn, below. Leave your email address, in case you win, like so: trish[at]trishperry[dot]com. If you subscribe to my blog, at right (or if you're already subscribed) you'll be entered an additional time to this drawing and all future drawings.

And check back on Monday, when we'll meet novelist Mary DeMuth, author of Daisy Chain. And we'll draw the winner of Renee Ryan's book, The Marshall Takes a Bride. You can still enter for that drawing under Renee's interview, below.

Monday, February 23, 2009

Renee Ryan and Free Books!

U.S. Marshal Trey Scott is fixin' to walk down the aisle just as soon as his stubborn bride-to-be agrees to say "I do."

Before we meet today's author, I'd like to announce that the winner of the signed copy of Lisa Lickel's book, The Gold Standard, goes to:

shryackmom@ . . .

Congratulations! I'll contact you today for your snail mail address, and we'll get your book to you right away. I encourage readers to keep commenting and/or subscribe at right in order to participate in future book give-aways!

And now let's meet novelist Renee Ryan, author of The Marshal Takes a Bride (Love Inspired Historical, February 2009).

Renee holds a degree in Economics and Religion and has explored various career opportunities, including stints at a Florida theme park, a modeling agency, and a cosmetic conglomerate. She taught high school Economics, American Government, and Latin while coaching award-winning cheerleading teams.

Several years later, with an eclectic cast of characters swimming around in her head, she began seriously pursuing a writing career.

Renee sold her first book, Extreme Measures, to Dorchester Publishing by winning the inaugural New Historical Voice Contest in 2002. She eventually reconciled her writing with her faith and began writing Inspirational Romances in 2006. She sold her first Inspirational manuscript to Love Inspired Historical in December 2006. Her first Love Inspired Historical will arrive in stores February or March of 2009.

When she's not writing for Love Inspired Historical, Renee works part time as a regional makeup artist for an international cosmetic company. She lives with her husband, two children,and one ornery cat in Nebraska.

Busy lady! Please tell us more about The Marshall Takes a Bride, Renee.

A true hero never leaves a damsel in distress--he marries her!

U.S. Marshal Trey Scott is fixin' to walk down the aisle just as soon as his stubborn bride-to-be agrees to say "I do." Katherine Taylor's five-year-old sister and an orphanage full of children are depending on her. So why won't the pretty schoolteacher marry him to save her tarnished reputation? Granted, Trey isn't willing to abandon his quest to avenge his first wife's murder. His name alone will protect Katherine until he returns, but she thinks he should leave vengeance to a higher power. Will the sacrifice demanded by the woman he loves be too great to bear . . . or will it be Trey's ultimate redemption?

The Marshal Takes a Bride is a story of redemption and forgiveness. The hero has lost his wife to a bullet meant for him. He is filled with guilt and doesn't believe he can move on with his life until he avenges his wife's murder. Vengeance becomes his only goal. The heroine has had her own set of past tragedies but is trying her best to move forward as best she can, especially now that she has to raise her little sister by herself. Both the hero and heroine are wounded, yet neither are victims. They're strong characters who are learning to face the harsh realities of a fallen world, even if their approach is highly flawed.

Add a precocious five-year-old little girl who wants these two to become her parents--officially--and the poor hero and heroine are doomed, at least in terms of holding onto their status quo.

Which character in your novel most interested you while you wrote? Why?

The hero, Trey Scott, really called to me while I was writing him. He's a true alpha male, a man used to controlling the world around him. He's in charge, all the time, and has subsequently built a wall around his heart. I really enjoyed taking him through the healing and forgiveness process. I didn't play fair, though. I gave him a beautiful, kind-hearted heroine and her irresistible five-year-old little sister. The poor man was doomed from page one. However, he did not go willingly. All the more fun, in my opinion.

Why will readers enjoy your novel?

The characters are real people. They are far from perfect and struggle with hard issues in their lives that modern readers will understand. There's high drama, lots of action and a sprinkling of humor. Although the characters live in a tough world they don't buckle under their hardships. They overcome. I hope it's a message readers can identify with.

If you were the casting director for the film version of your novel, who would play your lead roles?

Ah, the hardest question yet. For my hero, I'd probably cast one of the great Western actors from "back in the day." Photobucket I'm thinking a young Clint Eastwood.

Or Gary Cooper. Photobucket

The heroine is harder. Anne Hathaway comes immediately to mind.

PhotobucketEmmy Rossen is another.

I admit the Clint picture might be a little more alpha than you meant, Renee, but I love it! Somehow I don't see that shot on the book cover, though.

What facet of the writing craft comes easiest to you? Explain.


I love the initial plotting/brainstorming stage. It's what I call the honeymoon period, where there are all sorts of possibilities. I get to know and love my characters. I find out their strengths and weaknesses. I see where their growth will occur. Of course, getting all this on paper? Now, that's the hard part.

What do you struggle with in your writing?

Word choice. I can write a first draft quickly, usually under six weeks, but the second draft takes me three to fours times longer. I'll spend hours on a single paragraph, tweaking, rewriting, moving sentences around until I'm sure the words say exactly what I want them to say. My goal is to ensure the reader forgets the words and sees only the story unfolding image by image. I try to write visually, if you will. The old adage is true: Easy reading is hard writing.

A new writer tells you she's going to write her novel using the omniscient point of view. In three sentences or less, give her your thoughts on that idea.

I can answer this in three words: Don't do it! For further explanation, see my answer to the previous question. Omniscient point of view is about the words, the prose and the author's talent, not about the reader or the reader's experience.

Interesting response--I like it. Essentially, you're saying the omniscient POV can come across as self-indulgent, if I understand you correctly. I never thought of it that way, but it rings true.

All right, Renee, choose an inanimate object to represent you. Explain what you have in common with that object.


The joke around the Halverson home is that mom is the "lighthouse." As the stay-at-home member of the family, I'm the one constant. My kids and husband are all over town, running from activity to event to appointment while I'm always at home. Basically, I offer the stability during the everyday storm of life. Sure, it's corny, but even the cats know who to count on. I call them my little rowboats.

What is the last book you read that impacted you? How did it affect you?

Other than the Bible, which impacts my life daily, I would have to say the book Marley and Me impacted me the most. That book wasn't just about a dog. It was about an entire family, a family that constantly had to decide whether to unite or fall apart during hard times. I especially loved the underlying message of loving our family members regardless of circumstances. That means loving them flaws and all. The Grogans could have easily gotten rid of the naughty Marley, but they kept him and their lives were enriched for years because of that decision. In a world where disposable relationships are rampant, I was touched by the life-long commitment that family had for Marley and one another.

What are you working on now?

I'm working on the second book in a three-book continuity series for Steeple Hill's Love Inspired Historical line. The series is called: After the Storm: The Founding Years. It's connected to a six-book continuity series in Love Inspired's contemporary line. My deadline is mere days away from today, so I am keeping my head down and typing away.

Well, then, your taking time for us is doubly appreciated! Where else can readers find you or your writing online? Please include the link for purchasing your book.

The easiest way to find out more about me is on my website: www.reneeryan.com
The easiest way to purchase The Marshal Takes A Bride is on the eHarlequin website: www.eharlequin.com

Thanks, Renee, for visiting us today and telling us about The Marshall Takes a Bride! Readers, Renee has offered to sign a copy of her book for the winner of our drawing on Monday, March 2. To enter, leave a comment for Renee, below. Leave your email address, in case you win, like so: trish[at]trishperry[dot]com. If you subscribe to my blog, at right (or if you're already subscribed) you'll be entered an additional time to this drawing and all future drawings.

Check back on Thursday, when we'll meet novelist Lyn Cote, author of The Desires of Her Heart. And we'll draw the winner of Brandt Dodson's, Daniel's Den. You can still enter for that drawing by commenting after Brandt's interview, below.

Thursday, February 19, 2009

Brandt Dodson and Free Books!

A man and woman are caught in a game of cat-and-mouse where they learn just how big the cat can be, and that it's no game.

Before we meet today's featured author, I want to announce that the winner of Shirley Connolly's devotional, I See God in the Simple Things, is:

chemond@ . . .

Congratulations! I'll contact you today for your snail mail address, and we'll get your book to you right away. I encourage readers to keep commenting and/or subscribe at right in order to participate in future book give-aways!

And now let's meet novelist Brandt Dodson, author of Daniel's Den (Harvest House Publishers, February 2009). Tell us about yourself, Brandt.

PhotobucketI was born in Indianapolis and graduated from Indiana Central University. Before beginning my career as a Podiatrist, I was employed by the Indianapolis office of the FBI and served as a United States Naval Reserve Officer. I am the creator of the Colton Parker Mystery series, and the author of the stand alone novel, White Soul. I live in southern Indiana with my wife, Karla, and our two sons where I am active in my church and at work on my next novel.

Tell us a bit more about the plot of Daniel's Den.

PhotobucketDaniel's Den is a story of hope. The protagonists, Daniel Borden and Laura Traynor, are polar opposites and live hundreds of miles apart. But when unseen forces drive them together, they lose everything, including their very identities, as they flee in order to preserve their lives and untangle the web into which they've fallen. It's a story of the disaster that can happen when political corruption meets unchecked greed and the hope that can be found in God, regardless of the circumstances.

Which character in your novel most interested you while you wrote? Why?

Laura Traynor. Laura is a single mother who is struggling with the recent death of her husband while trying to keep food on the table and raise Andy, her precocious nine-year-old son. She's a portrait of courage, which President Kennedy defined as grace-under-pressure, but is expending her energy and drive on the wrong things. Laura has her own dreams to fulfill and must learn to follow God's lead in living her life His way.

Why will readers enjoy your novel?

We've all had moments of challenge; moments of great pain or loss. (If you haven't, then hang on. You will.) And we've all wondered where God was in the midst of our pain. But what most of us have failed to understand is that He was right there; right in the middle of our difficulties all along. We couldn't see Him because we wouldn't take our eyes off the problem.

In Daniel's Den, my hope is that the reader will see the tribulation that Daniel and Laura must endure while also seeing the hand of God at work in their midst. I want the reader to come away with hope. I want them to understand that God is in the midst of their troubles too. Anyone who is facing a great challenge will enjoy this book.

I can't imagine who wouldn't identify with your characters in some way, Brandt.

If you were the casting director for the film version of your novel, who would play your lead roles?


PhotobucketGeorge Stults, an accomplished actor who played on Seventh Heaven, comes to mind for the role of Daniel Borden. George is the same age, with the same features and build as Daniel.

PhotobucketFor Laura, I would cast Naomi Watts.

What facet of the writing craft comes easiest to you? Explain.

The first draft. No question about it. I'm not an outliner, so punching out the first draft is my one-and-only chance at free association. I just let 'er rip.

What do you struggle with in your writing?

Every draft that comes after the first one. I can't just let 'er rip anymore. It's during the subsequent drafts that I learn just how far off the mark I was in the first one, and how much work I have ahead of me if I want to do the best work I'm capable of doing.

We're talking a little about point of view this month. Say a new writer tells you she's going to write her novel using the omniscient POV. In three sentences or less, give her your thoughts on that idea.

You must tell the story in the most engaging way possible, which may mean finding a more intimate POV. Write it as you plan, but then re-write the first two chapters from differing points of view. After you've done this, analyze for the POV that best engages you as the reader.

And what an excellent writing exercise, regardless, right?

Choose an inanimate object to represent you. Explain what you have in common with that object.


A tennis shoe. I can fit in with most situations, I'm flexible, and can often pass through a crowd unnoticed.

Trust a podiatrist . . .

What is the last book you read that impacted you? How did it affect you?


The Faithful Spy by Alex Berenson. This is the first novel by this new and talented author, and it is as well written as any I've read. It won the Edgar award for Best First Novel and hit number one on the NYT bestseller's list. Quite an achievement for a first-time novelist. It humbled me and helped me to understand just how far I have to go.

Yes, I always find authors like that both encouraging and a kick in the pants at the same time. What are you working on now, Brandt?

A suspense novel titled The Hand of God. We have seen the enemy and he is us.

Ooo, I like that! Where else can readers find you or your writing online? Please include the link for purchasing your book.

The best to find me online is at my website, www.brandtdodson.com.
For purchasing online I would suggest: www.christianbook.com or www.amazon.com.

Thanks, Brandt, for telling us about yourself and Daniel's Den. Readers, Brandt has offered to sign a copy of his novel for the winner of our drawing on Thursday, February 26. To enter, leave a comment for Brandt, below. Leave your email address, in case you win, like so: trish[at]trishperry[dot]com. If you subscribe to my blog, at right (or if you're already subscribed) you'll be entered an additional time to this drawing and all future drawings.

And check back on Monday, when we'll meet novelist Renee Ryan, author of The Marshall Takes a Bride. And we'll draw the winner of Lisa Lickel's book, The Gold Standard. You can still enter for that drawing, below.

Monday, February 16, 2009

Lisa Lickel and Free Books!

Schoolteacher Judy and her opinionated cat uncover an eco-terrorist's plot to take over the country when they delve into the untimely death of Aunt Louise.

Before we meet today's author, I'd like to announce that the winner of the signed copy of Victoria Bylin's book, The Maverick Preacher, goes to:

kfp10596@ . . .

Congratulations! I'll contact you today for your snail mail address, and we'll get your book to you right away. I encourage readers to keep commenting and/or subscribe at right in order to participate in future book give-aways!

And now let's meet novelist Lisa Lickel, author of The Gold Standard (Barbour Publishing, January 2009). Tell us about yourself, Lisa.

I live in a very old house in Wisconsin with my husband, a high school science teacher who is very handy answering those pesky science questions. I love to perform and write radio drama with local group FreeQuincy Radio Theater, besides occasionally freelancing for magazines and newspapers and devotionals. I also love to travel, hand stitch quilts, putter in the garden and can vegetables and fruit.

I was raised by a history teacher and a librarian in a house filled with books. I agree that to work hard at being a writer, one should read every spare minute, and so I do. I started writing professionally after taking the Christian Writers Guild apprentice course. I am involved in every historical society within driving distance, a tribute to my BS degree in History and Russian Studies. I do as much volunteer work as I can with church and local organizations.

Now tell us a bit more about the plot of The Gold Standard.

Schoolteacher Judy Winters sets out to solve the mystery surrounding her only living relative's murder on the cross-state farm where Aunt Louise grew up. Judy will inherit the farm--if she agrees to stay there. But what about her boyfriend, Graham, and her job?

Meanwhile, Judy learns that, years ago, a friend of Louise's father, Bryce, lost a treasure of Alaskan gold somewhere on the property. He'd like to recover the gold if Judy plans to give up the place. As Judy and her handsome next door neighbor, Hart, uncover clues to Louise's untimely death and Bryce's missing treasure, they develop a close friendship. Was it the treasure that might have been behind Louise’s demise?

Graham's secret visits to the farm, midnight visitors, a new job offer, and new friends Bryce and the plaid-wearing Ardyth, along with one special old one--Carranza, the opinionated cat--all play a part in Judy's dilemma.

Which character in your novel most interested you while you wrote? Why?

I loved writing Ardyth, the slightly eccentric, plaid-wearing widow who couldn't see the forest for the trees. Maybe I'm getting older, but it was fun to write about a woman who was able to do and say pretty much whatever she wanted, and still be a romantic figure to the secondary hero.

Why will readers enjoy your novel?

The Gold Standard a multiple generation love story with a quirky double mystery. And a great cat. Who doesn't love an opinionated cat who can figure out the bad guy first? It's not hard to figure out the big "whodunit," but the revelation of the secondary mystery will please the reader and keep him or her guessing to the surprise ending.

If you were the casting director for the film version of your novel, who would play your lead roles?

Oy, I usually don't think about this. There are four lead roles: the young school teacher and her handsome neighbor, and the elderly couple. I don't have cable and I'm behind on newer movies, so I'm not sure who's who anymore.

Um . . . a thoughtful but enthusiastic adventuress to play Judy--someone like Anne Hathaway.

Hart would be a healthy but engaging engineering student, perhaps the young man who plays Wolf from CSI: Miami?



And the elderly couple: I have Lily Tomlin stuck in my head for some reason for Ardyth, and, honestly, Joe Biden for Bryce.

I've never watched CSI before, but the fellow you mention is Jonathan Togo. Nice to see a fresh face associated with someone's characters! And I tried to find a more folksy, less politician-mask-wearing shot of Joe Biden.

Now, tell us, Lisa, what facet of the writing craft comes easiest to you.


I have no end of plot lines and stories running like a raging map of rivers through my head. I have started four potential series so I just have to buckle down, choose one, and get typing on the next titles.

What do you struggle with in your writing?

The "writing by committee" style. I'm told I don't have enough confidence to just do what I think is best. Yet when I have professional critiques/edits done, or after my readers and my critique partners go over my finished work, I find myself making edits that try to please too many people and end up making the next person to look at the work unhappy. Where's the line?

Yes, you can lose your own voice when you bend to too many critiques, can't you? I've found it's best to pay attention to criticism when more than one critiquer mentions the same thing. Other than that, you have to stay true to what flows best for you. Here's another style-specific question for you, Lisa. Say a new writer tells you she's going to write her novel using the omniscient point of view. In three sentences or less, give her your thoughts on that idea.

While omniscient point of view used to be the norm in generations past, you would find that very difficult to sell in today's mainstream market, as only people like John Grisham can get away with it. Unless using this POV was a trick plot to move the story and you had very good representation with a firm offer, I'd advise you to be flexible with the characters and try, if only for practice, to write the story from several angles and see if something else works.

Excellent. Thanks. Now choose an inanimate object to represent you. Explain what you have in common with that object.

A deck of cards. There are many different individual cards within the deck, and while each alone could be decorative, you need more than one to entertain--and there are many ways to entertain yourself or others with that deck of cards. But if a card is missing, your game may be compromised. Like the card deck, I enjoy entertaining people with my variety of work; also, I have pleasure in simply writing the stories. Writing involves many aspects, such as research, partner readers and writers, editors, and good representation, but when one of them is missing, the work may not always be played out as it was meant to be.

What is the last book you read that impacted you? How did it affect you?

Every book impacts me in some way. I just put down Angela Hunt's The Face. Ever since reading her Uncharted, I’ve been struck by how inseparable what I believe about God and how I practice those beliefs have to be in order for me to truly be a woman of faith.

What are you working on now?

Rewrites, and plotting for the second and third novels in the Stories From Paradise House series, as well as publicity for my next novel, Healing Grace--due out in May--a story about a faith-healer who makes a difficult choice in order to feel forgiven.

Where else can readers find you or your writing online? Please include the link for purchasing your book.

As far as I know, readers can still purchase The Gold Standard through Barbour's Heartsong Presents: Mysteries bookclub site through this link: www.heartsongmysteries.com

Unfortunately, the book club will no longer release new titles after the third cycle, but readers can find single copies through me, until I hear otherwise. I have a short romantic mystery available for you to read online at my website, as well as links to the podcasts of the radio mystery plays available at FreeQunicy Radio Theater, and a link to an e-zine that has published the first of my children's historical stories--and other goodies for writers and readers to explore.

My website: www.lisalickel.com
My blog: www.livingourfaithoutloud.blogspot.com

Thank you, Trish, for this opportunity.

And thank you, Lisa, thanks for visiting us today and telling us about The Gold Standard! Readers, Lisa has offered to sign a copy of her book for the winner of our drawing on Monday, February 23. To enter, leave a comment for Lisa, below. Leave your email address, in case you win, like so: trish[at]trishperry[dot]com. If you subscribe to my blog, at right (or if you're already subscribed) you'll be entered an additional time to this drawing and all future drawings.

Check back on Thursday, when we'll meet author Brandt Dodson, author of Daniel's Den. And we'll draw the winner of Shirley Connolly's devotional, I See God in the Simple Things. You can still enter for that drawing, below.

Thursday, February 12, 2009

Shirley Connolly and Free Books!

God still speaks, if you and I will only listen. Through the eyes of a simple animal, through our families, even through the basic chores we do, we can find Him.

Before we meet today's featured author, I want to announce that the winner of Robin Shope's novel, The Valentine Edition, is:

bockoverve@ . . .

Congratulations! I'll contact you today for your snail mail address, and we'll get your book to you right away. I encourage readers to keep commenting and/or subscribe at right in order to participate in future book give-aways!

And now let's meet author Shirley Connolly and hear about her new devotional, I See God in the Simple Things (Vintage Romance Publishing, January 2009).

PhotobucketShirley Kiger Connolly, born and raised in the Pacific Northwest, lives on the Southern Coast of Oregon with her husband. Their three children are now grown. When not writing, Shirley is with her animals, doing stitchery, or reading, or watching classics with her husband. Shirley attended college in Northern California. She later became a graduate of Institute of Children's Literature.

A Christian for over forty years, it was through her relationship with the Lord, she developed a passion for women's ministry and teaching. This blossomed further when her husband went into pastoral ministry. While teaching, Shirley's love for research led to the publishing of two historical fiction novels.

Shirley also wears another hat, penning light-hearted devotional books. The first in a series of three, I See God in the Simple Things was released in January. Shirley's goal is to keep her fiction as true to life as possible, and focus her devotionals on simple everyday living to encourage her readers to enjoy life to the fullest, regardless of its difficulties.

Shirley, tell us a little more about the book.

PhotobucketIn all we experience through simple daily living, God has a way of faithfully showing us more about ourselves and where we truly are in our spiritual walks. Too often, we allow complicated circumstances to control our thoughts, making it more difficult to cope.

I See God in the Simple Things provides the reader, through each short devotional, a moment to reflect on the plain things a person goes through on any given day, no matter how mundane or troublesome they might be. God still speaks, if you and I will only listen. Through the eyes of a simple animal, through our families, even through the basic chores we do, we can find Him. How has He encouraged you today?

How are the devotions structured?

Each segment begins with a short reflection about life in general. Since the lessons are written to inspire the reader on how God teaches us through the simplest experiences of life, at the end of each reflection, the reader is given scriptural reference for further study and personal growth.

Since Simple Things is also a journal, there is an area for the reader to write down her own thoughts and observations about what she is going through in relation to the lesson itself. Because of the importance of daily prayer, there is also an area set aside to take a few moments quietly with the Lord.

Who would your book best serve?

I prepared I See God in the Simple Things for women of all ages--married or single--who are looking for insight or inspiration through what might appear at first to be a difficult or impossible situation. Anyone who enjoys seeing God with a smile, who likes to nod in agreement, or who perhaps can laugh about life now and then will find encouragement and enjoyment in this book.

Where can readers find Simple Things?

It can be found at Amazon.com or www.vrpublishing.com or www.bn.com before it finds its way into bookstores. If a reader is interested in purchasing an author-signed copy, I would be happy to provide one. Just drop me a line at sh1rlee@verizon.net.

And this isn't your only book, is it, Shirley? Where can readers learn about your other books?

My urls are apenforyourthoughts.blogspot.com and shirleykoinonia.tripod.com.

Thanks, Shirley, for telling us about yourself and I See God in the Simple Things. Readers, Shirley has offered to sign a copy of her devotional for the winner of our drawing on Thursday, February 19. To enter, leave a comment for Shirley, below. Leave your email address, in case you win, like so: trish[at]trishperry[dot]com. If you subscribe to my blog, at right (or if you're already subscribed) you'll be entered an additional time to this drawing and all future drawings.

And check back on Monday, when we'll meet novelist Lisa Lickel, author of The Gold Standard. And we'll draw the winner of Vicki Bylin's book, The Maverick Preacher. You can still enter for that drawing, below.

Monday, February 9, 2009

Victoria Bylin and Free Books!

Reverend Joshua Blue is searching for his sister when he meets Adie Clarke, a woman with a secret and a particular dislike of preachers.

Before we meet today's author, I'd like to announce today's book-drawing winner. The signed copy of Donna Schillinger's book, On My Own Now, goes to:

azv444@ . . .

Congratulations! I'll contact you today for your snail mail address, and we'll get your book to you right away. I encourage readers to keep commenting and/or subscribe at right in order to participate in future book give-aways!

And now let's meet novelist Victoria Bylin, author of The Maverick Preacher (Steeple Hill Love Inspired Historicals, February 2009).


Victoria Bylin writes for Love Inspired Historicals. Her next book, The Maverick Preacher, will be released in February 2009 and is a prequel to The Bounty Hunter's Bride (2008). Prior to joining LIH, Victoria wrote five westerns for Harlequin Historicals. Abbie's Outlaw was a 2006 Rita Finalist in the Best Short Historical category. She's also finaled in the Holt, the National Readers Choice Awards and the Bookseller's Best Awards.

Vicki really does believe in "happily ever after." She and her husband have been married forever and have two grown sons. Both are college students who occasionally return to northern Virginia for home-cooked meals. She and her husband also own a hilarious beagle/Jack Russell terrier named Hartley.

Vicki, tell us a bit more about the plot of The Maverick Preacher.

Here's the back-cover copy:

A Man on a Mission . . . Once upon a time, he was one of Boston's most righteous ministers. Now Joshua Blue is a guilt-stricken man scouring the West to find the sister he drove away with his pride. When the trail leads him to Denver, a beautiful boardinghouse owner might be the key to unlocking past secrets . . .

By sheer determination, Adelaide Clark has raised her young son alone. When Joshua arrives at her door, Adie fears he'll tear her family apart. As she gets to know the charming preacher, however, she sees he's come to make amends for past wrongs. Soon his strong faith sparks Adie's long-buried hope for a future with a God-sent partner at her side . . .

Which character in your novel most interested you while you wrote? Why?

I loved writing about Reverend Joshua Blue. Before I had a word of the story, I had the title. I could see a troubled man dressed in black, riding alone in search of something . . . or someone. Josh has made big mistakes, and he's paid for them. By the grace of God, he's come back from a disaster and is determined to make things right. I loved telling his story because I really do believe in big turn-arounds. There's not a problem in the world God can't fix.

Why will readers enjoy your novel?

At its core, The Maverick Preacher is a romance. It's about a woman who's given up hope of ever being loved, and a man who needs a family. Josh and Adie have a hard time. She has secrets and he's made mistakes. Yet they both triumph. There's always hope. I hope this book brings that inspiration to readers in all stages of life.

There's nothing quite as rewarding as hearing from a reader who feels that kind of hope after reading one of your books, is there? So, Vicki, if you were the casting director for the film version of your novel, who would play your lead roles?

Johnny Depp would make an excellent Joshua Blue.

Adie Clarke has reddish hair and is young, about twenty years old. Can I go back in time and pick Julia Roberts?

Sure you can go back in time--you're in charge here! That's one of my favorite things about writing fiction, the way we get to imagine situations and details as we want them to be. What facet of the writing craft comes easiest to you, Vicki? Explain.

Editing comes easiest by far. I love the hunt for the perfect phrase, the perfect word. I'm a puzzle addict. I do crosswords, cross sums, anacrostics, anything in a Dell-brand puzzle book. Editing is like assembling a verbal puzzle. I enjoy putting small pieces together and discovering a bigger picture.

Hmm. You sound like you'd make an interesting mystery writer, too. What do you struggle with in your writing?

First drafts are hard for me. A blank computer screen is one of the scariest things in the world. I've had to learn to put aside my internal editor and "just tell the story." My first drafts are truly dreadful. They're poorly written, riddled with cliches and just plain dull. But they accomplish one thing . . . they put the puzzle pieces in the box. The editor arrives and story starts to unfold.

Ah, so you're working the puzzles with your current writing, as well. Now I want to ask you to advise new authors for a moment. This month we're taking a look at point of view. Say a new writer tells you she's going to write her novel using the omniscient point of view. In three sentences or less, give her your thoughts on that idea.

If you love writing in omniscient POV, go for it. But be aware . . . it's unique. Being unique will set you apart in a good way or a bad way, depending on the quality of your story.

Choose an inanimate object to represent you. Explain what you have in common with that object.

How about my 2002 Toyota Camry? It's got some dings in the paint, but it runs great. It's low maintenance and is happy to wait in the parking lot while I browse bookstores.

What is the last book you read that impacted you? How did it affect you?

I recently finished Francine Rivers' Mark of the Lion trilogy. These books inspired me to be bold in telling a story. Where darkness abounds, light abounds much more. By describing both darkness and light as fully as she did, Ms. Rivers gave a resonant voice to the fullness of the Christian experience. I'm in awe of these books.

What are you working on now?

I'm under contract for four more Love Inspired Historicals. The next is called Kansas Courtship. It's set in 1859 Kansas in a town devastated by a tornado. It's part of a continuity called "After the Storm." After that, I'll be writing the next book in the series called The Women of Swan's Nest. The Maverick Preacher is the first in this series. The next book is almost done and will be followed by two more.

Where else can readers find you or your writing online? Please include the link for purchasing your book.

My website: www.victoriabylin.com
My blog: www.victoriabylin.blogspot.com
Love Inspired: www.loveinspiredauthors.com
My book is available at Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and ChristianBook.com

Vicki, thanks for visiting us today and telling us about The Maverick Preacher! Readers, Vicki has offered to sign a copy of her book for the winner of our drawing on Monday, February 16. To enter, leave a comment for Vicki, below. Leave your email address, in case you win, like so: trish[at]trishperry[dot]com. If you subscribe to my blog, at right (or if you're already subscribed) you'll be entered an additional time to this drawing and all future drawings.

Check back on Thursday, when we'll meet author Shirley Connolly, author of I See God in the Simple Things. And we'll draw the winner of Robin Shope's novel, The Valentine Edition. You can still enter for that drawing, below.

Thursday, February 5, 2009

Robin Shope and Free Books!

A talented journalism graduate not only lands the worst job on planet earth but the love of her life had just married her best friend.

Before we meet today's featured novelist, I want to announce that the winner of Ann Shorey's novel, The Edge of Light, is:

chellegoodson@ . . .

Congratulations! I'll contact you today for your snail mail address, and we'll get your book to you right away. I encourage readers to keep commenting and/or subscribe at right in order to participate in future book give-aways!

And now let's meet novelist Robin Shope, author of The Valentine Edition (The Wild Rose Press, January 2009). Tell us about yourself, Robin.

PhotobucketMy literary works include approximately two hundred articles in magazines such as: Live, Lookout, and Breakthrough. My short stories appear in books such as A Match Made in Heaven, Stories from the Heart, and In The Arms of Angels, by Joan Wester-Anderson, as well as Chicken Soup books. One story, "Mom's Last Laugh," was re-enacted for a PAX-TV program: It's a Miracle.

I co-authored a thriller, The Chase, for Revell. My other books include The Replacement (2006) and The Candidate (2007). With The Wild Rose Press, I have The Turtle Creek Series: The Christmas Edition (2008), The Valentine Edition, (February 2009), The Easter Edition (2010), and The Harvest Edition (2010). Wildcard, a thriller/romance, releases April 2009.

I am the Special Education Coordinator at a county school for troubled teens. Married for thirty-three years, we have two grown children. My husband and I live near Dallas, Texas and are former missionaries.

Robin, tell us a bit more about the plot of The Valentine Edition.

PhotobucketThe last place in the world Jodi Williams wanted to live was Turtle Creek, Wisconsin, but when her stepdad refused to put in a good word for her at the Chicago paper, she had no other choice than to accept the first job offer that came her way.

Josh Thomas was Turtle Creek's veterinarian, but he also happened to be single and quite handsome. His life was pretty peaceful until a pretty, young stranger came to his clinic with a dog that had been hit by a car. While his first reaction was to care for the injured animal, he couldn't help a few glances at this unique young woman.

That day was one of quite a few new beginnings. Jodi came to the aid of an injured animal, earning her the respect of a handsome man, she started a new job as a reporter for The Turtle Creek Newspaper, and she gained the wrath of the vet's receptionist. Della had her sights set on Joshua, and she wasn't about to let anyone come between her and the man of her dreams.

Which character in your novel most interested you while you wrote? Why?

My favorite character plays a minor but most important role in The Valentine Edition. She is the advice columnist and her name is Ulilla Langston. With a heart of gold, she sees good in every person and offers comic relief during tense scenes. A would-be romance writer herself, Ulilla has a love of words and uses her Thesaurus as one would use a Bible when quoting scripture. "There is a word for every occasion!" she gushes.

Why will readers enjoy your novel?

Center stage is romance. Jodi Williams is in the matchmaking mood and runs ads in the local newspaper to match women with their mate by profiling men by the magazines they read. Even with the most romantic holiday coming up, the book has more to give the reader. It's about offering forgiveness when you have good reason to hate; trusting love one more time when every cell in your body screams to run away. Romance readers will be transformed with optimism for their own happily forever ending. Valentine's Day is when we all watch for that bouquet of flowers to arrive and listen for a declaration of love over a candlelight dinner. It's what heroine Jodi Williams wants, too. Fingers crossed for this Valentine's Day, all Jodi's previous Valentine Days have been most disappointing. Just when she thinks her dreams really will come true for the first time, they are snatched away.

If you were the casting director for the film version of your novel, who would play your lead roles?

PhotobucketDoctor Josh Thomas would be played by Hugh Jackman.

PhotobucketJodi Williams would be played by Hillary Swank.

What facet of the writing craft comes easiest to you? Explain.

I am constantly flooded with new ideas. It's hard to get them all down at times. I start the first chapter of a new book at the same time two more book ideas arrive.

What do you struggle within your writing?

Transitions. My transitions can be rough. I try to solve this with chapter breaks or starting a new chapter.

I would imagine if you could solve a rough transition by starting a new chapter, you were probably at a good chapter-ending point anyway, right?

This month I'm asking my featured authors to consider the issue of POV (point of view). Inexperienced novelists often bounce around from one character's viewpoint to another's within any given scene. So, Robin, pretend a new writer tells you she's going to write her novel using the omniscient point of view. In three sentences or less, give her your thoughts on that idea.


This POV is tricky. Pick one main character for the reader to follow. Don't make every character's POV equally as important. Too much information and emotion may overwhelm the reader so that he/she has no emotional bond to any of the characters.

Beautifully said, Robin. I completely agree. Now, choose an inanimate object to represent you. Explain what you have in common with that object.

I am the Energizer Bunny. I keep going and going and going!

What is the last book you read that impacted you? How did it affect you?

Island of the Blue Dolphins was the first book that impacted me and made me a lifetime reader.

What are you working on now?

I am working on another romance series.

Where else can readers find you or your writing online? Please include the link for purchasing your book.

My Shoutlife page: www.shoutlife.com

My blog: write2robinshope.blogspot.com

Thank you, Robin, for telling us about yourself and The Valentine Edition. Readers, Robin has offered to sign a copy of her book for the winner of our drawing on Thursday, February 12. To enter, leave a comment for Robin, below. Leave your email address, in case you win, like so: trish[at]trishperry[dot]com. If you subscribe to my blog, at right (or if you're already subscribed) you'll be entered an additional time to this drawing and all future drawings.

And check back on Monday, when we'll meet novelist Vicki Bylin, author of The Maverick Preacher. And we'll draw the winner of Donna Schillinger's book, On My Own Now. You can still enter for that drawing, below.

Monday, February 2, 2009

Donna Schillinger, Free Books, and New Books!

When the rubber hit the road and my Christian morals were put to the test, all my tires went flat . . .

Before we meet today's author, I'd like to announce today's book-drawing winner. The signed copy of Pamela Tracy's novel, Daddy for Keeps, goes to:

grammieofsix@ . . .

Congratulations! I'll contact you today for your snail mail address, and we'll get your book to you right away. I encourage readers to keep commenting and/or subscribe at right in order to participate in future book give-aways!

And now let's meet author Donna Schillinger, author of On My Own Now (The Quilldriver, April 2009).

A born and bred Texan, Donna Lee Schillinger has a bachelor's degree in behavioral science and a master's in cultural anthropology. She served in the Peace Corps in Quito, Ecuador, and continued to work in social services for 10 years, serving several years as executive director of a homeless shelter for single, young mothers.

In 2000, Donna "retired" from social work to take care of her elderly grandparents and homeschool her daughter. She soon began The Quilldriver, a custom publisher for nonprofit organizations and traditional publisher of inspirational nonfiction books.

An award-winning editor and publisher, Donna makes her writing debut with On My Own Now: Straight Talk from the Proverbs for Young Christian Women who Want to Remain Pure, Debt-free and Regret-free. She launched a nonprofit organization of the same name, with the mission to provide encouragement for young adults to maintain their Christian faith when they get out on their own.

Donna lives in rural Arkansas with her husband John and children.

Donna, tell us about On My Own Now.

PhotobucketOn My Own Now is about strengthening young women's faith and preventing the screw-ups that can brand us for life. I draw on my eclectic past and use gender-reversed Proverbs with real-life applications to wave the red flag of caution for young women, warning against the pitfalls of a post-modern, sexually casual, consumer-is-king society that is indelibly scarring youth with cynicism, sexually transmitted diseases, and bad credit.

What prompted you to write the book?

When I was a teenager, I used to read Proverbs religiously (no pun intended). I latched on to some key verses, but to be honest, I didn't really believe that most of the Proverbs applied to me and my life. King Solomon spends a lot of time telling young men to stay away from prostitutes and I was pretty sure that would never apply to me. And in the literal sense, I was right. It wasn't until I read Proverbs again for the first time in a long while, when I was 40 years old, that I realized all those warnings to stay away from prostitutes had been for me, specifically for me in my youth, even though I've never visited a prostitute and can safely say I never will.

I desperately needed the Proverbs in my young adult years--from the time I left for college through Peace Corps service, and 15 years of "single and loving it!" But I didn't realize it, because I didn't have the time or make the effort or whatever was needed to extrapolate the lessons behind all those "stay away from prostitute" warnings. Consequently, I've had my share of heartache--mostly of the self-inflicted variety. Through a series of bozo moves in my youth, I screwed up big time creating all kinds of problems for myself. Though I'm not proud of my jaded past, I decided to get some mileage out of my mistakes by helping young Christian women.

In retrospect, when I realized how much I could have benefited from some straight talk from the Proverbs, the first thing that occurred to me was that I needed to find a way to convey the importance of the Proverbs for a regret-free life to my own daughter, who at the time was 10. So I started to pick out some verses for her and illustrate them with some stories from my life that were a bit more mature than she could handle at her age. As I wrote on a daily basis, the Holy Spirit started to challenge me with the idea of sharing these lessons with a larger audience. I set out a few fleeces before actually deciding to come out from behind the byline and be the writer instead of editor on a project.

How is the book organized?

On My Own Now is organized into twelve chapters on various central themes from the Proverbs and from real, young adult life. Some chapter titles are "When Morality Meets Reality," "This is Me--Fearless!," and "Living La Vida Buena." Within each chapter are several sections, each based on one or more Proverbs.

For example, a section in "Living La Vida Buena" is 'Lotto--You Have to Play to Lose,' and it's based on Proverbs 28:19, "She who works her land will have abundant food, but the one who chases fantasies will have her fill of poverty." (Notice I changed the gender in the proverb. I have found it makes an incredible difference in the impact the proverb has on me to insert my gender. It not only personalizes it, but it opens the proverb up to a host of applications that would not have occurred to me if I were thinking in gender-neutral or in male-gender terms.)

Finally, most of the sections contain some scenario from my life or the life of someone I know that illustrates the proverb in a very real, modern way. Keeping with our same Lotto example, in that section, I recount how I wasted a lot of mental energy scheming ways to get rich--everything from playing the lotto to going on The Price is Right--and how I finally learned that quick riches are not my destiny.

Who should read the book?

Of course, as the subtitle makes clear, On My Own Now is for young Christian women. However, I think that women of any age would enjoy it and the truths certainly apply to men as well. In particular though, the burden of this book is for young women.

The period of wandering I experienced is characteristic of young adulthood. A September 2006 report from the Barna Group revealed that, despite strong levels of spiritual activity during the teen years, 61 percent of young adults disengage from active participation in the Christian faith during their young adult years. This is the time of making important life choices and it's problematic that it may also coincide with a time during which youth abandon wisdom and the faith of their families for partying and worldly credos.

And women have an added component of confusion during these years as they boldly experiment with equality. I think of shows like Sex in the City that can be so confusing to young women, and it affirms to me how relevant and crucial the Proverbs are for young women today.

When the rubber hit the road and my Christian morals were put to the test, all my tires went flat, and it happens to a lot of young women. Before I got my second spiritual wind, I had a child out of wedlock and a broken and battered heart to show for my ride. I want so much better for my daughter--for all our daughters. On My Own Now is about strengthening young adults' faith and preventing the screw-ups that can taint our youth.

What are you working on now, Donna?

For those who have had similar workings of the Holy Spirit in your lives, it will come as no surprise that the prompting to write a book was just the beginning of the challenges. Last fall, I founded On My Own Now Ministries to reach young adults, ages 17 to 23, with multimedia that provides biblically based content to bolster their faith, encourage nonconformity with the larger society, and stress wise choices in health, relationships and finances.

Now I have a free monthly e-zine called Single! Young Christian Woman, offered by e-mail or podcast and archived online at my web site (link below), and another book in the works, Purity's Big Payoff/Premarital Sex is a Big Rip-Off, due out in Spring 2010. This book is going to be a collection of essays from people who have waited for sex until marriage and were glad they did, and alternately, from those who didn't wait and have regretted it. I would like to invite anyone interested in contributing an essay for the book to contact me directly for more information. The submission deadline is March 31.

Where can readers learn more about you, your book, and your ministry, Donna?

Visit my web site and e-zine at www.OnMyOwnNow.com

Visit my publishing web site at www.thequilldriver.com

Donna, thanks for visiting us today and telling us about On My Own Now! Readers, Donna has offered to sign a copy of her book for the winner of our drawing on Monday, February 9. To enter, leave a comment for Donna, below. Leave your email address, in case you win, like so: trish[at]trishperry[dot]com. If you subscribe to my blog, at right (or if you're already subscribed) you'll be entered an additional time to this drawing and all future drawings.

Check back on Thursday, when we'll meet novelist Robin Shope, author of The Valentine Edition. And we'll draw the winner of Ann Shorey's novel, The Edge of Light. You can still enter for that drawing, below.

Finally, take a look at these wonderful Christian novels releasing during February!

1. Evidence of Murder by Jill Elizabeth Nelson from Steeple Hill. When a business owner discovers on her property evidence of a decade-old multiple murder, she and the surviving son of the massacre become targets of a desperate and powerful killer.

2. Framed!, Book 2 of the Without A Trace continuity series by Robin Caroll from Steeple Hill Love Inspired Suspense. A modern day Romeo and Juliet story.

3. Gingham Mountain Lassoed in Texas Series by Mary Connealy from Barbour Publishing. A school marm fears cruel intentions when a rancher, with a special heart for unwanted children, adopts too many of them.

4. Illusions by Wanda B. Campbell from Urban Christian. Illusions depicts the struggles of a young pastor and wife.

5. Insight by Deborah Raney from Steeple Hill. Two people brought together by tragedy discover an amazing connection that threatens to tear them apart.

6. Love Finds You In Last Chance, CA by Miralee Ferrell from Summerside Press. A woman trying to make it alone in the old west, a man she isn't sure she can trust, and someone who threatens them both.

7. On a Killer's Trail by Susan Page Davis from Love Inspired Suspense. Can a reformed bad-boy detective and an ambitious reporter overcome their past to solve a string of crimes?

8. The Desires of Her Heart by Lyn Cote from Avon Inspire. The Desires of Her Heart is based on authentic Texas history and portrays the expansion of Angloamericanos into Spanish territory.

9. The Gold Standard by Lisa Lickel from Barbour Publishing - Heartsong Presents: Mysteries. Judy's last relative, Aunt Louise, was poisoned - but how?

10. The Renewal, Book 2 of the Project Restoration Series by Terri Kraus from David C. Cook. For single-mom Leslie Ruskin and master carpenter Jack Kenyon, both starting over in a new town, could working together on restoring the Midlands Building be a blueprint for disaster, or will their lives be transformed by the promise of a new Occupant?

11. Wind Dancer by Jamie Carie from B&H Publishing. Revolutionary period of escaping captivity and finding true salvation.

Happy reading!
 

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